Author Topic: Sun Tug Build.  (Read 37192 times)

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gregk9

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Sun Tug Build.
« on: April 08, 2010, 01:44:38 »
I now have recieved my Sun Tug kit, opened the box and had to giggle to myself!  To be honest, this is the first real "assembly boat kit" I will of undertaken. But after all the renovations and repais Ive done to all the secondhand boats Ive bought over the past couple of years, think its time I moved up a peg and actually had a "go" myself.

yes, this is an old style kit, there is a lot of wood working to do and to get right to achieve the correct effect and fit, but, its my own time and I will try my best to get it all right, hopefully with the readers/watchers of the build blog as well.

So, if any of you have any hints, tips or suggestions, kindly send them in for me, as all this helps as my own inexperience can be greatly assisted by all your experience [hopefully].

many thanks in advance

Gregg.

PS,
the last pic on this post is of the lifeboat, as supplied in the kit! no not having a larf, this is actually it!
As already suggested by a forum member, i will simply replace this with another item, my wood carving skills can be counted on the fingers i'd loose trying to carve this [ha ha ha].

think I'll just sand it, varnish it and use it as a paperweight!
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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Kieran H

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2010, 06:00:19 »
that looks like a very nice looking tug from the box pic. lots of pics.

gregk9

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2010, 06:48:38 »
Thanks for that, Ive just had a "little go" at the assembly [dry run] and after a minor bit of sanding and filing, have slotted in 2 hull bulkheads and the 2 pieces of base deck. All i can say is, "there's loads of room in that hull for a fair few toys!
just spoilt for choice as to what to fill it with.
We'll see  what decisions I come to later on. Smoke generator maybe? hhmmm
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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lightshipman

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2010, 11:42:03 »
Bit like my Ironsider, I can't believe the amount of space I've got to fill, I can see just how much now I have the deck on,, I also own a MMM Nangee, and I have a sound system, smoke generator water pump for fire monitors and 6 way switcher in that.
Keeping the Bristol Channel safe
Nav Aids Tender Skipper

gregk9

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2010, 08:10:57 »
My requests and searches for details are starting to bear fruit. many many sincers thanks to 2 fellow forum members who have graciously sent me copies of build instructions and now a complete set of full size plans. My data bank is starting to fill with all the right sort of info.

many thanks Guys !
But if anyone else has any pictures or the odd page of info, please contact me, as the more the better i say, better to get it built right first time, rather than it either look wrong or it necessitates a part rebuild later..... no one wants to do that !!!
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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gregk9

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2010, 08:20:16 »
After studying the boat plans, I decided to do a word search and came up with this little fact page, about  the actual shipbuilders who built the life size tug, plus the rest of its forerunners too. It does an account of fact contained within a book that has been written about the shipbuilders "philip & Son Ltd", of Dartmouth, but some of you may just find this little snippet interesting enough.

read on:-
Philip & Son Ltd., Shipbuilders & Engineers by Derek Blackhurst

Derek Blackhurst is well known to members of this Society and for many years took a leading role with the World Ship Society. He was invited by Philip and Son to write the company's history and was given unrestricted access to the company records. Regrettably the records were not in good physical condition with many rat-eaten and mouldy. The result of his labour is a detailed account of the last working shipyard in South Devon.

The story of this Dartmouth shipbuilder spans two complete centuries from 1800 when the Sandquay shipyard was opened by Sir John Searle. Following the author's introductory remarks there is a most useful chronology of the history of Philip & Son, which allows the reader both an overview of the story before reading the text and a ready guide to the key dates. The written history is contained within the first third of the book and is followed by almost 100 pages listing in some detail the ships and craft built, each with a short account of their life and fate. Four appendices follow listing 'Miscellaneous vessels owned by the Philip family and the Shipyard', 'Yachts listed in registers as built by Philip and Son Ltd', 'Miscellaneous yard tugs owned by the Philip family and the Shipyard', and 'Light vessels built by Philip and Son'. A striking feature of this book is the rich profusion and variety of the illustrations.

A clear style and the use of sub headings guides the reader through a fascinating story of commercial endeavour and technological advance through peace and war. The story of the yard is punctuated by anecdotes of daily life such as when Alex Philip engaged in a brawl with a rival's accountant. Tragedy took its part in the story; the air raid on 18 September 1942 killed twenty of the workforce and injured many more.

The yard built a wide variety of vessels both civil and military. The first vessel launched was the schooner Mary & Elizabeth, and the last the single screw steel Brixham trawler Ocean Spirit. Between these launchings 1,495 other vessels from brigantines to Flower class corvettes, tugs, trawlers, light vessels, RAF bomb scows, and the last sailing vessel to be built for the Royal Navy, went down the ways into the River Dart. Each one of these has been thoroughly researched and their details recorded. The illustrations have been carefully chosen and depict the variety of work carried out at the yard. The caption to the dramatic illustration of the Norwegian heavy-lift ship Belnor loading launches for Nigeria wrongly recording the vessel as the Belray being the only obvious error.

This book will appeal to a wide range of readers. Those interested in local history will find a useful source of information supplemented by maps and diagrams showing the changes in the yard. For those with an interest in shipbuilders there is in this book the tale of the changing fortunes of a small shipbuilder from the later part of the Napoleonic wars to almost the present day. Researchers will find much detail in the main ship listing and accompanying annexes. Overall it is an absorbing book and one which the hand will stretch out to in that odd moment when you want to sit and browse.

Editors note: Derek Blackhurst has indicated that this book is available to members of our Society at the reduced price of 18. Contact Derek, his details are in the membership booklet.


Preston, Ships in Focus Publications, 2001, 160 pp, numerous photographs, figures, plates, appendices, index, ISBN 1 901 703 42 8 21.00


Reviewed by Bob Wilson
 
No, im not on comission to sell the book, but was not going to delete any of the section.
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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tugnut

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2010, 12:16:01 »
Hi gregg i have built the 21  my mate still has it i will get some pict for you.
On my model i made the superstructure and engine room casing to fit over commings.
 The one piece deck is a pain .I also have a vidio of them being built.
 Regards john b
john b

gregk9

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2010, 14:39:18 »
Hi Tugnut, thanks for thew offer of some puictures, that would be great if you can, all info is always appreciated before I start any major work.

I have tried a fit of the 2 deck halves on top of the 2 inner bulkheads and floor supports. I must admit, it took only a little sanding with my "black n decker mouse" and they hooked in a treat, nice tight fit, the only gaps i have are towards the bow taper. and I think I can easily resolve this if I basically "teak plank" the deck, but by glueing planking strips over the top of the split halves, thus loosing the join seam AND being able to loose the over sized  superstrructure base which seems to over lap too far forward and towards the stern, making it look too bulky. I already have my eye on some nice lightweight strips of wood and it cant be any worse than wooden flooring at home [ha ha ha].
id sooner do this than try and score "plank effect" on to the 3mm thin ply. After a slight sanding of the plank edges it should give a good planked floor effect and show the plank edges uo quite good me thinks. simply bonding down the wood strips "as it comes" will simply defeat the object and easier off just scoring the deck, but deck is a little too thin for my liking to accept too much scoring, it could fail and split.

Plus it only means lowering the bulkheads by about a further 2mm [ plus lowering all the  hull edge deck supports too], but not the end of the earth as the bulkheads need some stern sanding to gain the hull inner profile anyway. i will however trace the original bulkhead profiles on to some more ply before i start to modify them, "just incase" i either sand too far or they snap in half whilst under sander attack !
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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model tugman

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2010, 10:44:55 »
Hi Greg  Tugnut is a good builder and has a lot of info about building the XXI, he is also my little (well not so little) brother.

atb Geo  stick to the XXI as that hull is not right for thr bigger sisters.
Tugs are for life      George B

tugnut

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2010, 07:59:45 »
Hi gregg sent some pictures .
My mates on the lake yesterday
john b

gregk9

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2010, 14:09:24 »
Thanks for the pictures!.
the tug looks really great in the sunshine.
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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gregk9

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powerplant
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2010, 03:37:04 »
Just recieved delivery of a Hectoperm motor. Do you think thuis would be on in the Sun tug? I appreciate the motor is 6v and i'm going to run 12v batteries, so I may loose some of the low speed/low rpm, but with a decent esc it could well be suited torque wise, providing I dont go too heavy on the throttle stick.
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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gregk9

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2010, 09:32:16 »
I have actually made a start, doing some basic woodwork, but its a start nevertheless.
I have started to bond the upper deck sections together, but having to be careful, to ensure the correct radius is retained, to match the deck floor, otherwise a nasty gap will appear where its too easily noticed.

whilst this is bonding, Ive had a look at the bridge "wing", but looking at all my scetches and drawings, the one supplied and the kit drawings differ from this, so Ive recut and shaped the side radius to match the original spec drawings and not the kit supplied. [see pic's].
next bit along from this is, the kit states to glue the navigation lights to the sides of the bridge wings, but photo's show these being "inset" into the weings so they sit flush with the outer panel skin.  HHmm, Lesro dont seem to of got much studying done when this kit was produced, So now I will only use their instructions as a "general guide", preferring top use original photo's and plans [kindly supplied by forum member] for the alignment/accuracy bits prior to final shaping and fixing.

I have also found that the bridge roof section is narrower than the floor plate, suggesting that the sides of the wheelhouse taper towards the top, however the back wall has vertical sides?
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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gregk9

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Re: Sun Tug Build.[progress report]
« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2010, 05:23:57 »
Continuing on with building the upper wooden sections, I have glued the wheelhouse back and sides together, but untill dry, unable to then insert the 2 front/side panels, which will then give the correct front radius shape. But in doing so it leaves you unable to get back at the interior. So Ive cut an access panel in the roof, so then able to fully shape the cabin, paint internally, add an interior and the glazing before closing off with the roof, which will no be covered by the flying bridge assembly, so my cutaway wont be seen, it also allows me to add an interior light as the flying bridge closes the deal.

I have also decided as to how to power up the red/green nav lights, so once the bridge wall is cut to allow the lamps to inset, I can now drop the tag ends of the led's down through the floor and solder to 2 copper strips ive bonded to the underside of the deck, enabling me to attatch to wires right inside the boat and not show any nasty cables on the exterior. Thin adhesive copper strip is something Ive used in the past on my model train layout, as well useful for laying power tracks around under a set of houses/ street lights, where you have a lot of connections on basically "the same circuit" so to speak. Plus once soldered and tested, its flat enough on its own to only need an overcoat of paint and barely visible afterwards.

mind you, if any of you ever see my boats out somewhere, I'll know who you are, as you'll al be bending over, trying to see the wiring tracks! [ha ha ha].
Best Wishes.

Gregg.
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model tugman

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Re: Sun Tug Build.
« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2010, 05:29:35 »
Well done Steve you are cracking on well :) 
Tugs are for life      George B