Author Topic: Newbie Amsterdam build  (Read 38470 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

tbone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 383
Newbie Amsterdam build
« on: February 26, 2011, 18:18:37 »
I finally got myself a tug to build.  It has been partially started by a previous owner but very little has been done.  
I'll try and put up some pics soon so you can all see what I'm starting with and offer me any advice/opinions for the build.

Tbone

tugs53

  • Moderator
  • Admiral Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 6632
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2011, 18:52:31 »
Congrats on your purchase tbone!

Looking forward to seeing the build thread.
I think there's a few experienced Amsterdam builders here on the forum.
MIKE

tbone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 383
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2011, 19:57:21 »
I hope these pics work.
Took a good look at the tug now and have found a few things:
-the prop shaft is bent; fortunately it isn't mounted in the hull yet
-the deck is glued to the hull really well; the braces and stringers(?) however are attached to the hull with clear silicone!  This can be peeled off the hull by hand so it needs to be reglued.

I'm missing the rudder tube that goes into the hull, looks like it's just a brass tube.

tbone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 383
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2011, 21:56:12 »
I spent some time tonight and scraped some of the silicone out of the hull and put some epoxy in it's place.  I roughed up the hull with sandpaper; we'll see tomorrow if it holds. 

What would the experts here recommend to glue the deck to the hull?  It's stuck on really well in most spots but there's a few spots where it's unglued.  Might try CA since it will flow in between the hull and deck. 

I've seen some epoxy with a long tube on the end, thinking that would work to get the rear framing/stuffing tube glued to the hull.

Also thinking about adding a bow thruster and possibly kort nozzle.  These are things I need to figure out pretty quick before much else goes together.

Thanks
Tbone

Puffin

  • Admiral Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1433
  • WestMinster Apache
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2011, 01:08:23 »
HI THONE ; Put some deck beams in , then put your deck on it . I use zap and baking soda for filler . I also use EP-11 epoxy which is the strongest .  You can find EP 11 at5 any HOME HARDWARE store .      PUFFIN

tbone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 383
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2011, 12:45:44 »
Thanks Puffin.

Any recommendations on Bow Thrusters?  I looked online and found there's several different sizes.  Thinking about 1" would be good.

Tbone

woodbutcher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 548
  • Lloyd B. Gore
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2011, 14:40:00 »
I'd recomend a paddle type bow thruster,(less moving parts, and no gears to worry about meshing properly.) The 1" paddle type thruster on the Sealane will spin boat and barge around without any trouble . Manufacturer is up to you.Al

sea.mariner

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 4660
  • I Know a fair bit about tugs but am always learning !
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2011, 14:53:46 »
Thanks Puffin.

Any recommendations on Bow Thrusters?  I looked online and found there's several different sizes.  Thinking about 1" would be good.

Tbone

My thoughts would be not to add a bow thruster, with twin motors she should spin in her own length if you use tank steering.

As Al says, the paddle type I would go for, I have 2 of them in one tug, as long as you mount them before you seal the deck just incase you need to replace the paddle or motor, i.e. depending where you have an access hole in the deck, you will need to angle them to get a screw driver in to remove them.

Regards, Dan.
Photos / Information, I nearly have them all !

oldiron

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 183
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2011, 15:17:15 »
Tbone:

 Do you want me to post any pictures I have of the Amsterdam on here, for your reference?

John

tugs53

  • Moderator
  • Admiral Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 6632
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2011, 15:49:37 »
"My thoughts would be not to add a bow thruster, with twin motors she should spin in her own length if you use tank steering." sea mariner

Twin screw???  Not unless one modifies the build ??? ???

I'd go for the paddle-type thruster, and steerable kort nozzle.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2011, 16:02:52 by tugs53 »
MIKE

oldiron

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 183
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2011, 16:07:38 »
Tbone:

 One modification I would make while you are early on in the build is to build a pocket for the anchors. Artesania has never modified the kit to include anchor pockets. They are on the prototype and vastly improve the appearance of the vessel.

John

tbone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 383
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2011, 17:28:59 »
Thanks for all the feedback guys. 

Oldiron-I saw your build of the Smit Nederland and it was fantastic, I'd love to see the build of your Amsterdam.  What did you use for power?

It is a single prop and I think it would be best to put a bow thruster in, I will be looking for a 1" unit.

I'd like to put in a kort nozzle, either fixed or steerable.  The fixed would be easiest, don't know how complicated it would be to put in a steerable nozzle.  I will definately be looking into it.  The propshaft I got in the kit is bent so now would be the time to make changes to the drive.  If anyone has put a bowthruster in an Amsterdam I'd like to see pics of that too.  I'm thinking I'll have to mark the water line to see where to position the bowthruster openings.

On another note, last night I peeled out some of the silicone that had been used to attach the braces into the hull and tried using some epoxy.  I scuffed the hull with sandpaper before applying the epoxy and it appears to be holding well.  The epoxy peels off the shiny parts of the hull with some effort but where the hull was scuffed up it won't budge.

Tbone

woodbutcher

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 548
  • Lloyd B. Gore
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2011, 17:58:58 »
yeh, the trouble with silicon is it is very hard to get rid of it. lots of sanding and silcon solvents and it still seems to be there.Al

Sudbury II

  • Admiral Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1640
Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2011, 19:26:13 »
Acetone will get rid of silicon, but be real careful!!!!!!! It also eats polyester resin , i.e. fiberglass.

Dan, what's up with your "twin screw" comment?

t bone...you may find that fitting a steerable nozzle is easier than a fixed one.
Have a look at the one on the Harbor Models site. Economical, and efficient.


Suds
« Last Edit: February 27, 2011, 20:53:16 by Sudbury II »
"Suds"

tugs53

  • Moderator
  • Admiral Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 6632
« Last Edit: February 27, 2011, 21:21:01 by tugs53 »
MIKE