Author Topic: Newbie Amsterdam build  (Read 36307 times)

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sea.mariner

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2011, 01:32:18 »
Sorry guys, I made a bit of a boo-boo there ! When I was a member of the Aberdeen Model Boat Club a member there had an Amsterdam which he converted to twin screw, and very good at manouvreing it was  :)

Regards, Dan.
Photos / Information, I nearly have them all !

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2011, 03:38:18 »
Tbone:
  years ago a friend of mine built the Amsterdam, like mine, with plank on frame construction. These were the Artesania style in the 80's. Anyway, he installed a bow thruster, about 3/4" if I remember correctly. It worked very well. One of the design mods this vessel could use, bow thruster or not, is a larger rudder. Mine was built as per plan, but the rudder area was highly unsuitable for the model. I had to retro fit a larger area for adequate turning. This is something you may want to watch for as you build yours.

John

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2011, 03:42:19 »
As to Kort nozzles. The French Naval version had a Kort nozzle. I don't know if the Amsterdam did or not, however, it wouldn't surprise me if it did. I've gleaned these pics from the net.

John

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2011, 03:46:26 »
  John Fryant wrote an excellent article on building the Artesania kit back in the eighties. He gave the ups and downs of the model and the corrections to make it accurate to prototype in  "Ships in Scale". The issues involved were the Nov./Dec. 1988 issue. I think the series started in Sept/Oct.'88 and ran for five issues.

John

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2011, 03:52:47 »
  The rear deck detail on my Amsterdam is as per Fryant's article. It is a fir bit different from the kit's offering and agrees more with photos of the prototype. I had to scratch build the aft deck fittings to match the photos. As per John Fryant's suggestion I also cut the engine room cover height down a scale foot (about 1/4"). I think it improves the vessel's appearance.
 The first picture is the prototype stern, the second is John Fryant's model and the third is my Amsterdam's stern.

John

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2011, 04:36:10 »
Here's another picture of the prototype. Good luck with the build.

John

model tugman

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2011, 04:50:11 »
Here are a couple of pictures of my Brother Peters Converted Amsterdam with a reworked bow and Kort nozzle fitted
Tugs are for life      George B

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2011, 05:03:22 »
Here are a couple of pictures of my Brother Peters Converted Amsterdam with a reworked bow and Kort nozzle fitted

  Nice looking workman like vessel.

John

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2011, 05:12:10 »
Thanks for all the feedback guys. 

Oldiron-I saw your build of the Smit Nederland and it was fantastic, I'd love to see the build of your Amsterdam.  What did you use for power?

Tbone

  Thanks very much for the kind words on the Neddy build.
  My Amsterdam was built from an eighties Artesania kit, long before the internet was around, so a build thread was never done. That said, here's mine.
 I originally had a Decaperm motor in it. It performed well.......until it died one day. I've got a direct drive motor in it now running at 12V. Its OK, but I prefer the Decaperm.

John

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2011, 06:40:43 »
Thanks guys, those models look great.

I've been told and read a few things now saying the Amsterdam is somewhat unstable as it's top heavy with all that structure on it.  It seems with a kort nozzle to improve the steering it magnifies the instability.  Has anyone here experienced this?  I'm thinking now about making some changes to the kit.

Tbone

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2011, 08:21:38 »
Thanks guys, those models look great.

I've been told and read a few things now saying the Amsterdam is somewhat unstable as it's top heavy with all that structure on it.  It seems with a kort nozzle to improve the steering it magnifies the instability.  Has anyone here experienced this?  I'm thinking now about making some changes to the kit.

Tbone

  I've never found my Amsterdam to be unstable, although I don't have a Kort nozzle. I keep the battery and weight as low as possible in the hull. She's taken waves over the bow with no problem.

John

tugs53

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2011, 08:41:17 »
Those are mighty nice looking builds there John...and George :) :)
« Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 08:50:28 by tugs53 »
MIKE

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2011, 08:53:43 »
Those are mighty nice looking builds there John...and George :) :)

Thanks very much.

John

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #28 on: March 01, 2011, 23:10:36 »
Spent a while cleaning out all the silicone that was in the hull to frame connections.  I mixed up some epoxy and put it into the joints; used cold cure epoxy for the first time and it was pretty runny but should work.

I've got a lot of ideas and tons more questions but once I get the hull frames secure the first order of business will be to choose and install a bow thruster and decide on propulsion.  Thinking of a 1" bow thruster and kort nozzle. 

Not sure if I'll use a fixed or steerable nozzle, steerable would probably be best.  Looks like somewhere around 3" would be a good size but a 3.5" could be squeezed in...

Any opinions on bow thruster, nozzle, prop and prop shaft would be great as would recommendations on where to get them for a good price.

Tbone

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #29 on: March 01, 2011, 23:11:16 »
Sorry, double post-deleted.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 23:13:17 by tbone »