Author Topic: Newbie Amsterdam build  (Read 36272 times)

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oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2011, 03:12:04 »
Tbone:
  You can make a Kort nozzle from a piece of plastic drain pipe from Canadian Tire. That's the cheapest and easiest way. I think a steerable nozzle would be the easiest and most effective. I'm not much help on prop shafts and tubes as I make my own.

John

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #31 on: March 02, 2011, 20:16:20 »
I reglued the deck in a few spots and am still waiting for the epoxy to cure completely.  I've noticed a small crack in the hull which will have to be fixed during the build :(

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #32 on: March 03, 2011, 00:51:01 »
Here's a pic of the crack in the hull, it's at the back where the prop shaft will come out.  If it was built as per the kit this area would be filled and sanded to shape which would could be done with epoxy to seal up the crack.  Not sure what will be in this area if I go with the steerable kort.  It should be a pretty easy area to fix and hide, let's hope there aren't any more surprises like this!

tugs53

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2011, 09:09:17 »
I have a spare Aluminum Kort you can have..if you want.
It will use a 95mm prop, and can be fixed or steering.
MIKE

woodbutcher

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2011, 11:47:57 »
you can use a bit of cloth and epoxy on the inside to fix the crack or if your a bit lazy just mix some short strand filler (gives more strength than cabisyll or micro balloons) with the epoxy and butter it on. remember to sand the existing fiber glass and wipe with acetone first. Athing to note is once you have epoxied something, you must allways stick with epoxy as polyester will not stick to epoxy. Al

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #35 on: March 05, 2011, 10:06:33 »
The hull is abs plastic, and there's no access to the inside since the wooden supports are all in.
I'll fill it with epoxy when I get the prop shaft in place.  Still trying to decide on a power/prop/shaft setup.  

Considering going brushless, outrunner and esc can be had for around $65 online; just not 100% sure about motor selection.  I could go brushed, can get an automotive fan or power seat motor for under $20 but brushed speed controls are getting harder to find and aren't cheap.  Plan to run it on 12V sealed lead acid for the weight(ballast).  I'd like to talk to more people who've got brushless setups as it's still pretty new to most people here.

For prop/nozzle size I'm thinking 75mm or bigger though under 100mm, probably steerable nozzle though I haven't got anything yet.

I was thinking about building the kit as a completely different boat but have now decided to build the Amsterdam superstructure with some changes along the way.  Put some of the houseworks together last night and it went ok, the wood is nice but a bit warped.  The house doesn't sit flat on the deck so there's either a gap at the front or rear bottom depending on which end you sit flat.  There's 6 slots that the house sits into on the deck but it's neither an easy or secure way of keeping it in place, not to mention once there's paint on it it won't fit.  Planning on using magnets and adding some combing to locate/secure it.

A final question for right now:  What should I use as the first coat on the wood?  I've heard of sanding sealer but would like the name of a product I could get at home depot or cdn tire locally.

Thanks
Tbone

PS-tugs, thanks for the offer, I'd like to try that kort

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #36 on: March 05, 2011, 11:39:34 »

Considering going brushless, outrunner and esc can be had for around $65 online; just not 100% sure about motor selection.  I could go brushed, can get an automotive fan or power seat motor for under $20 but brushed speed controls are getting harder to find and aren't cheap.  Plan to run it on 12V sealed lead acid for the weight(ballast).  I'd like to talk to more people who've got brushless setups as it's still pretty new to most people here.

Thanks
Tbone



  With regard to brushed motor controls, I'd like to mention this supplier in Ajax, Ontario. There have been good reports from his controls:
http://www.eaelec.com/ea_hobby/hobby.htm

I've used power seat motors in a couple of my tugs with great success. the price is certainly right at Princess Auto.

John

tugs53

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #37 on: March 05, 2011, 17:30:37 »
Hi Tony:

I'll snap a picture of the kort this eve.
MIKE

tugs53

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #38 on: March 06, 2011, 09:07:48 »
Here's a picture of the Kort.
May be a tad large for your build though..at 97mm ID.
MIKE

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #39 on: March 06, 2011, 09:20:14 »
That is a nice Kort but I think it might be a bit big.  75mm would be ideal.  How much more power would there be from going a bit bigger, maybe 10mm or so?

Going to try and get some more done today and post some pics of the progress.

Tbone

woodbutcher

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #40 on: March 06, 2011, 17:26:22 »
just be carefull. I put an oversize prop and nozzle on my Sealane and the torque reaction from turn ing that big prop almost spins the boat over, had to decrease throttle output on the transmitter to 60%. Al

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #41 on: March 06, 2011, 17:42:12 »
  My Amsterdam runs a 70mm four bladed prop with no problems. Its quite smooth really. As to Kort nozzles, I've got two vessels with them and I'm not so sure how big a gain they provide on the model. The prototype had one, but to put one on a model just to look for more power I suspect you may be disappointed.

John

Sudbury II

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #42 on: March 06, 2011, 17:53:18 »
A 95mm prop may be just a little big; I'm thinking.
She'd sure pull though, but like Al say's, the torque may be overwhelming.

Suds
"Suds"

tbone

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #43 on: March 06, 2011, 18:45:02 »
I definitely want it to pull well, a 70mm prop would be good but if 80mm would be a lot better I'd rather upgrade from the start.  I have read that adding a nozzle makes a noticable difference from an open prop and these models seem to be known for poor steering especially in reverse.  Would an open prop and huge rudder be just as good?

Still need to know what to prime/seal the wood with.  I tried home depot, asked the paint specialist for 'sanding sealer' and he looked at me like I was from another planet!

oldiron

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Re: Newbie Amsterdam build
« Reply #44 on: March 06, 2011, 18:58:57 »
I definitely want it to pull well, a 70mm prop would be good but if 80mm would be a lot better I'd rather upgrade from the start.  I have read that adding a nozzle makes a noticable difference from an open prop and these models seem to be known for poor steering especially in reverse.  Would an open prop and huge rudder be just as good?

Still need to know what to prime/seal the wood with.  I tried home depot, asked the paint specialist for 'sanding sealer' and he looked at me like I was from another planet!

  I think the only way you're going to get a good answer on the prop nozzle thing is to do a comparison of two similarly equipped tugs.
  As to sealer, I assume you're talking about the deck. I cover the deck with fiberglass resin, sand and paint. I get the stuff Canadian Tire has in their auto body section. rolls on real nice and seals the wood well.
  For the rest of the structure try shellac, sand and then prime with a good scratch primer. Here CTC has a good one.

John