Author Topic: Airbrushing  (Read 4443 times)

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Kimosabie

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Airbrushing
« on: May 08, 2012, 09:38:40 »
Hello fellow members,

I've since realised that painting with a spray can is okay for large areas but anything more detailed is somewhat challenging...and by brush just doesn't give me the fine detail I demand...so question?
Can anyone recommend an airbrush / compressor brand-model, after googling I found the Iwata is the best, if so which model as they don't really explain which model does what better, I'm not into cake decorating or body art! I want to be able to paint fine detail after the bulk of the main superstructure has been painted, I know masking will still be required but a bit lost with what to buy...any advice much appreciated...

PS I don't mind what country the brands come from just want advice from someone already airbrushing, thanks in advance.

Kim

Model Tug Man

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2012, 09:52:05 »
I have owned a Badger airbrush and compressor for almost 30 years. Neither have given me any problems or required repair. Accessories are readily available at the local hobby store and on line. So reliability and availability are two of the things I would recommend.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 03:26:36 by Model Tug Man »
VGJQ

Kev30

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2012, 10:26:21 »
Hi Kimosabie
I would like to back up what model tug man recommended and that's a Badgers airbrush. I started spraying using there 250 model which is a straight forward basic airbrush but most of the time now I use there 200 model which I think is great after using a airbrush you wouldn't like to go back to using a paint brush, the only thing to remember is you must clean them out and you'll have no problems for the next time you use it.

The compressor I use is a model that Axminster Power Tools sell that has a small tank attached again I've had it 10 years no problems, with airbrushes you get what you pay for but unless your going to do really small fine work the Badger 200 series will suit you down to the ground.
Hope this helps?
Will you be going to Dortmund again next year?

Regards
Kevin

donald.waller1

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2012, 19:13:23 »
 ^-^ ^-^  I bought all my airbrushing stuff from "Anything Airbrush, " web site they have a very large collection of compressor's and airbrush gun's.

sea monkey

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2012, 19:49:44 »
Years ago I used to be an airbrush illustrator. I used an Aerograph Super 63 and a Badger. I preferred the Aerograph as it was easier to disassemble to clean.
I still have several Aerographs but these days I use a $29 Chinese made airbrush from a car accessories supplier. It does the job just as well as the more expensive models. It also has a much larger reservoir bottle which is better for large areas such as hulls. You can also buy extra bottles so you can have several colours ready and waiting. The bottles don't let the paint slop out, which can happen on airbrushes without reservoir lids.
The critical things with any airbrush are paint consistency and the clean up afterwards. I use satin enamels (house paint and model paint) and use thinners (not turps) to dilute the paint to about the consistency of milk. Any thicker and it'll clog, any thinner and it'll be too transparent. Spray thinners through to clean up. Thinners can be tough on any rubber O rings and lungs.
You can use acrylic paints but you need to use an extender to stop it drying in the airbrush. I've never got used to acrylics.
My compressor is the cheapest I could find (2hp motor/$48/car parts place again). It's got a reasonable sized air tank so it doesn't come on/off all the time. Remember to flush out any moisture from the tank before use as the moisture comes out as small beads of water in the paint not good. Empty the tank after each use.
Don't have the pressure set to high as you'll use much more paint and the overspray will go everywhere. Wives tend to not like that.
Steve

tbone

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2012, 21:49:49 »
Steve, do you have a make/model or link to the airbrush you use? 

Kimosabie

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2012, 03:59:58 »
Thanks guys, great response! I'm glad I asked or would of been wasting money on a Iwata!
Sounds like a Badger is the ticket, great care on the cleaning and practice practice practice!

I notice compressor guys give the decibel rating usually around 50-60 range, without googling it, is that acceptable to run in the house or is it too loud, of course it wont be going for hours but weather in England is challenging and would rather have it inside for warmth and dryness.

Kimosabie

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2012, 04:02:10 »

Will you be going to Dortmund again next year?

Regards
Kevin
[/quote]

Hi Kevin,

Yes absolutely...too good to pass up, but be prepared for lots of walking, great beer and lots of Bratwurst!

Kev30

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Re: Airbrushing
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2012, 11:24:43 »
I forgot to mention in my last message regarding airbrushing that the "ABRASIVE GUN" that Badger manufacture is an absolutely superb bit of kit if you want to clean up any metal fittings that you might of made for your model, gets in even the tightest of corners that sandpaper / emery cloth won't get into. BUT KEEP TO THE SAFETY GUIDELINES/INSTRUCTIONS

No good for spraying mind but when it comes to cleaning up small metal fittings its fantastic.  :)

Regards
Kevin