Author Topic: Tow line size  (Read 3833 times)

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BIKERBOB

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Tow line size
« on: July 06, 2012, 10:26:53 »
Good day folks

I have no expererence with tugs; but am building a TID tug at a scale of 1:24
My question is what diameter or circumference would the tow rope be?
Drawing gives the following info
loa 71 feet
max speed 7 knots
hp indicated 220
hp nominal 36.4
displacement 124 tons
Bollard Pull 2 tons

Thanks
Bikerbob

Model Tug Man

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Re: Tow line size
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2012, 11:23:14 »
Welcome, Bob. A member, Tiny, just did a TID 164 build and would be a good reference point for you. I would assume that the TIDs would use a hawser rather than a wire due to their relatively low power and lack of a winch. With this in mind I would expect the diameter to be larger than wire which would have a 2 1/2 inch diameter full size. Hope you post a build thread for your project. Good luck.

TM
VGJQ

Lighterman

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Re: Tow line size
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2012, 23:59:17 »
Little tip:
for tow ropes and deck rope i get "piping cord" from a haberdashery shop it comes in many diameters and if you get the cotton one you can dye it down with an acrylic wash (light tan) or soak them in old coffee.
As it's a TID then i suggest the cord as modern rope would look out of place.
if you want to start getting into it i suggest splicing a "towing spring" which was used a lot on craft tugs, this is a short line maybe going from the hook to the after rail with an eye slice each end and then either a wire or a rope tail. A metal thimble spliced into the hook end was to help prevent chafe at the hook. on craft tugs on the Thames used leather collar laced round the eye.
there was a time when some smaller tugs in the craft trade would have a tyre in the spring when the boat had a dead hook and to take the snatch out of the rope.
the smaller diameter cord is a bit of a bleeder to splice on the eyes, so i tend to do a "gravesend splice" to the uninitiated thats a half hitch and a tuck.
for a 1/24th scale look for a 4mm 3 strand cord as the towrope and maybe 2mm for mooring lines.
 

model tugman

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Re: Tow line size
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2012, 07:23:46 »
Ha Ha  I always thought it was a Charlton Splice   :-* :-*
Tugs are for life      George B

BIKERBOB

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Re: Tow line size
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2012, 12:46:31 »
Little tip:
for tow ropes and deck rope i get "piping cord" from a haberdashery shop it comes in many diameters and if you get the cotton one you can dye it down with an acrylic wash (light tan) or soak them in old coffee.
As it's a TID then i suggest the cord as modern rope would look out of place.
if you want to start getting into it i suggest splicing a "towing spring" which was used a lot on craft tugs, this is a short line maybe going from the hook to the after rail with an eye slice each end and then either a wire or a rope tail. A metal thimble spliced into the hook end was to help prevent chafe at the hook. on craft tugs on the Thames used leather collar laced round the eye.
there was a time when some smaller tugs in the craft trade would have a tyre in the spring when the boat had a dead hook and to take the snatch out of the rope.
the smaller diameter cord is a bit of a bleeder to splice on the eyes, so i tend to do a "gravesend splice" to the uninitiated thats a half hitch and a tuck.
for a 1/24th scale look for a 4mm 3 strand cord as the towrope and maybe 2mm for mooring lines.

THANKS FOR THE INFO ON TOW LINES; YOU MUST HAVE READ MY MIND AS THE NEXT QUESTION WAS THE SIZE OF MOORING LINES. CAN YOU SUPPLY MORE INFO ON TOWING SPRINGS;  OR SUPPLY A LOCATION OR PHOTO WHICH WOULD SHOW ONE IN USETHANKS
BIKERBOB

Lighterman

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Re: Tow line size
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2012, 13:09:03 »
TOUCHE Geo! thought that might get a comment:)
here are some pictures of towing springs yo can see the spring (white) has an eye splice and the tail (cory candy stripe) is spliced in.
on the markrock there is a wire in a rope and a rope tail to make fast on the craft. the general idea that the tails get most wear on the bitts of the craft and the spliced spring gives a little give when taking the strain, or stopping the surge when some bleeding ship or ship towing tug goes running by flat out and having the craft banging about and the tea slopping out of the cups!  :P

BIKERBOB

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Re: Tow line size
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2012, 08:32:34 »
TOUCHE Geo! thought that might get a comment:)
here are some pictures of towing springs yo can see the spring (white) has an eye splice and the tail (cory candy stripe) is spliced in.
on the markrock there is a wire in a rope and a rope tail to make fast on the craft. the general idea that the tails get most wear on the bitts of the craft and the spliced spring gives a little give when taking the strain, or stopping the surge when some bleeding ship or ship towing tug goes running by flat out and having the craft banging about and the tea slopping out of the cups!  :P

Thanks for the photos and explantion.
To show my complete lack of knowlege in this area; am I correct that the spring line is a line divided in the center with an eye splice and an eye at each end. The center eye would go to the tow hook. This leaves two ends for the tow cable. In the b/w photo it appears that the tug is using both ends and two tow cables. Is this standard practice or would they use the two ends and a single tow cable depending on towing requirements.
bikerbob

Lighterman

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Re: Tow line size
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2012, 03:31:09 »
on closer inspection it looks like the eyes of the spring are on the hook  then there is a wire with two thimbles as the intermediate and this is close up on the craft's bit heads (towing posts) with a rope tail to make fast as getting wires round a post id a tad dodgy and would cause problems casting off when manoeuvring. towing of single craft is a mine field in it's self and if you want to know give me 2 weeks notice and i will set too and get some illustrations and write a blurb. in general single craft can be held alongside or from the hook on a short rope.
depending how the barge behaves it can stay right behind light as the prop wash goes under her loaded craft on their own behind can run you ragged and this can be checked with a head and quarter rope or 2 quarter ropes. Most Thames lighters ( we call them craft or barges) have a swim head i.e. sloping. canal craft ( sometimes referred to as "long-un's" or lea barges) have a stem head and most times have a rudder steered by a tiller bar. these were normally un shipped when in a tow and only used up the canal or creek when towed singly,  by a tosher or a horse or tractor. the length of thin tow rope made sure the wash of the tug did not create to much disturbance round the plate of the rudder.
hope thi helps if not drop me a line and i will try and tell the whole story from the point of view of a lighterage tug skipper or a lighterman.
M