Author Topic: Do you know the Meaning ?  (Read 33656 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

thelongbuild

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
    • Runcorn & District Scale Model Boats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #45 on: January 11, 2013, 10:17:34 »
I having been watching this thread and I Take it that this thread is all tongue in cheek ?, If not,  if a Yellow card has been issued and then the thread allowed to continue by the yellow card issuer then said issuer of yellow card in fact should also be issued a yellow card and should in fact not be moderating this particular thread as they have themselves sanctioned the thread by allowing its continuation and joined in so are no longer in a position to moderate said thread..
If this thread re yellow, red and pink poka dot cards is genuine , Can I remind people that this forum was started as a separate forum to another because of such alleged moderation I seem to remember from that forum.

Happy New Year !!! :'(
Next Build M.S.C Volant after 1 other.

russellward

  • Site Supporter
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 265
    • New Zealand Workboats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #46 on: January 11, 2013, 11:32:59 »
Stand to attention, there and no talking in the ranks. Wipe that smile off yer face my young sir, or I'll wipe it off for you!
Point taken. As I understand it, this thread was started as an academic effort to clarify some of the more obscure quotes that we drop into our conversation. This is a very English language thing -and look where it got us.
So, we seem to have a couple of quotes that need sorting. One -a four letter word as all the good ones-  I am very familiar with now that daughter 5 month grandson is with us overnight. I am not sure it really refers to cargo stowage. I think it is probably more to do with having a morning blow down (steaming term).
The other also deals (on the surface of it) with an anatomical situation wherein he who finds himself in that position has few options. I respect the input of the seers.
Standing by for the next salvo regarding the inner meaning of this thread.

thelongbuild

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
    • Runcorn & District Scale Model Boats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #47 on: January 11, 2013, 11:53:49 »
Stand to attention, there and no talking in the ranks. Wipe that smile off yer face my young sir, or I'll wipe it off for you!

Excuse me I have 4 pips to your 3 , now off you go and scrub the heads  :P
Next Build M.S.C Volant after 1 other.

Footski

  • Moderator
  • Admiral Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3284
  • Just me and my good lady
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2013, 11:59:02 »
I having been watching this thread and I Take it that this thread is all tongue in cheek ?, If not,  if a Yellow card has been issued and then the thread allowed to continue by the yellow card issuer then said issuer of yellow card in fact should also be issued a yellow card and should in fact not be moderating this particular thread as they have themselves sanctioned the thread by allowing its continuation and joined in so are no longer in a position to moderate said thread..
If this thread re yellow, red and pink poka dot cards is genuine , Can I remind people that this forum was started as a separate forum to another because of such alleged moderation I seem to remember from that forum.

Happy New Year !!! :'(

Not too sure I fully understand all this, but the bottom line is.....A YELLOW CARD TO FOOTSKI!........That's a first.. ??? ??? ???
Barry

russellward

  • Site Supporter
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 265
    • New Zealand Workboats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #49 on: January 11, 2013, 12:07:30 »
Stand to attention, there and no talking in the ranks. Wipe that smile off yer face my young sir, or I'll wipe it off for you!

Excuse me I have 4 pips to your 3 , now off you go and scrub the heads  :P
Scrubbed 'em, surrr! The hands had good aim this morning, makes life easier, surr.
Now, I wonders. Why wuz they called "Heads"?

thelongbuild

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
    • Runcorn & District Scale Model Boats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #50 on: January 11, 2013, 12:13:42 »
Thank Gawd for that as I thought I was about to be sent to bring the bucket for you to mop to the heads as Footski has 5 pips to my 4 and your 3, Can we combine them so we have 7 to Footski's s 5  ;D

"Heads" yes Why !! Heads, nothing to do with Bulk -"Head" is it ?.

Also just in case, should point out I don't like yellow, a Burnt Orange is more my Colour.. angel

Love Google

Head (ship's toilet)


The use of the term "head" to refer to a ship's toilet dates to at least as early as 1708, when Woodes Rogers (English privateer and Governor of the Bahamas) used the word in his book, A Cruising Voyage Around the World. Another early usage is in Tobias Smollett's novel of travel and adventure, Roderick Random, published in 1748. "Head" in a nautical sense referring to the bow or fore part of a ship dates to 1485. The ship's toilet was typically placed at the head of the ship near the base of the bowsprit, where splashing water served to naturally clean the toilet area.

Other maritime uses of the term refer to the top or forward part, such as the mast (top of the mast/masthead), and the top edge of a sail, as well as the compass direction in which the ship is pointing, etc

http://www.history.navy.mil/trivia/trivia03-2.htm

Thought they said "Never pee into the wind" !!
« Last Edit: January 11, 2013, 12:17:18 by thelongbuild »
Next Build M.S.C Volant after 1 other.

russellward

  • Site Supporter
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 265
    • New Zealand Workboats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2013, 12:47:39 »
When I was young, (going back a bit this one) I was rambling round the Auckland wharves when I should have been in school getting what they call an education (haw haw!). There was a fishing boat of Brittany origins which had been brought over to NZ by some dreamer who then couldn't get her through survey. The parts of her that didn't resemble corn husks had the consistency of tinned pears.
I was intrigued to see that the only concession to the crew's comfort and meditation was an 18" wide two inch thick plank which projected aft from the taffrail (now there's another one. Why wuz it called that?) or counter (what is the origin of counter?). It was painted flakey old paint white like the rest of the hull and the part at the outboard end was worn smooth and slightly form fitting to make it easier to get a grip between the thighs. There was a copper funnel recessed into the top.
Now was that still a head do you think? Would certainly have been a bidet when she was in a following sea!
Wouldn't pass muster these days. But what a way to spend a peaceful moment or two of conjecture of a morning! 
Beats having to get down on all fours with spanners and screwdrivers and four letter words to clear a valve in an old pump action head which has got itself blocked. Probably after some overnight visitor has stuffed too much bumf (where did that one come from) down it.  Happy daze!

russellward

  • Site Supporter
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 265
    • New Zealand Workboats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2013, 13:23:43 »
Thank Gawd for that as I thought I was about to be sent to bring the bucket for you to mop to the heads as Footski has 5 pips to my 4 and your 3, Can we combine them so we have 7 to Footski's s 5  ;D

"Heads" yes Why !! Heads, nothing to do with Bulk -"Head" is it ?.

Also just in case, should point out I don't like yellow, a Burnt Orange is more my Colour.. angel

Love Google

Head (ship's toilet)


The use of the term "head" to refer to a ship's toilet dates to at least as early as 1708, when Woodes Rogers (English privateer and Governor of the Bahamas) used the word in his book, A Cruising Voyage Around the World. Another early usage is in Tobias Smollett's novel of travel and adventure, Roderick Random, published in 1748. "Head" in a nautical sense referring to the bow or fore part of a ship dates to 1485. The ship's toilet was typically placed at the head of the ship near the base of the bowsprit, where splashing water served to naturally clean the toilet area.

Other maritime uses of the term refer to the top or forward part, such as the mast (top of the mast/masthead), and the top edge of a sail, as well as the compass direction in which the ship is pointing, etc

http://www.history.navy.mil/trivia/trivia03-2.htm

Thought they said "Never pee into the wind" !!
Crusty is contemplating the wisdom of the admiral introducing a Brown Card. This is specifically for officers and crew who openly quote from online reference sources. Crusty expects crewmates to be subtle. Well maybe not so subtle if the circumstances are propitious.
Seeking  discussion on the possibility of a Brown Card if you please.

Footski

  • Moderator
  • Admiral Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3284
  • Just me and my good lady
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2013, 14:11:08 »
Ang on a mo........Got enough on our plates with two coloured cards......No room for a third.... :-\ :-\ :-\ :-\
Barry

Todd

  • Admiral Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1141
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #54 on: January 12, 2013, 05:51:56 »
THE HEADs

Quote"Other maritime uses of the term refer to the top or forward part, such as the mast (top of the mast/masthead), and the top edge of a sail, as well as the compass direction in which the ship is pointing, etc"unQuote

In the use of the term 'the head' when describing the masthead I would normally use the word 'truck' when referring to the head of the mast.(The bearing through which the top halyard runs...usually also classed as the highest point of the vessel.)
In the use of the term in regard to the compass when asked "where is your head ?" it would be normal to give a reply as to the compass point to which your vessel is heading and therefore can be classed as an abbreviation.

 :o    :o    :(

Jim
Capt Jim

donald.waller1

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 242
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #55 on: January 12, 2013, 09:22:00 »
 :P :P :P :P
Point of order, a BUCKET in the navy is known as a FANNY no yellow card this time me think's.

donald.waller1

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 242
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #56 on: January 12, 2013, 09:50:40 »
 :P :P :P :P :P
Just a quick point of order for Mr. Russellward:- the meaning of my original word is" CORRECT", it has nothing to do with steaming down etc. it mean's Store High In Transit, it was some thing to do with a cargo that gave off  gas when mixed with water or sea water, thus causing the cargo ship to explode and sink.

russellward

  • Site Supporter
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 265
    • New Zealand Workboats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #57 on: January 12, 2013, 10:41:03 »
Hence the shouted term *poo* when the crew were being flung up into the air by the explosion.
All is revealed!

thelongbuild

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
    • Runcorn & District Scale Model Boats
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #58 on: January 12, 2013, 10:41:53 »
cargo that gave off  gas when mixed with water or sea water, thus causing the cargo ship to explode and sink.

Never a good thing  :o
Next Build M.S.C Volant after 1 other.

TugMaster

  • Administrator
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1125
  • Welcome Aboard !
Re: Do you know the Meaning ?
« Reply #59 on: January 14, 2013, 04:32:30 »
Come on then, back to the essence of this thread .... "Do you know the meaning ?"

A shot across the bows
 
All at sea
 
Anchors aweigh
 
Batten down the hatches
 
Between the Devil and the deep blue sea
 
Broad in the beam
 
By and large
 
Chock-a-block
 
Close quarters
 
Copper-bottomed
 
Cut and run
 
Edging forward
 
Fathom out
 
Full to the gunwales
 
Get underway
 
Give a wide berth
 
Go by the board
 
Hand over fist
 
Hard and fast
 
High and dry
 
In the offing
 
Know the ropes
 
Loose cannon

On your beam ends
 
Panic stations
 
Plain sailing
 
Push the boat out
 
Shipshape and Bristol fashion
 
Shake a leg
 
Shiver my timbers
 
Slush fund
 
Taken aback
 
Tell it to the marines
 
The bitter end
 
The cut of your jib
 
Three sheets to the wind
 
Tide over
 
Walk the plank
Ok, so I like a drop !