Author Topic: Advice soldering brass rod  (Read 7174 times)

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tbone

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Advice soldering brass rod
« on: July 26, 2013, 23:16:40 »
Just wondering what people are using to solder brass rod together for railings etc...
I've been told to use silver solder but not sure which to use.  I can find 2% and 4% silver solder in solid and rosin core. 

Any advice on the subject would be appreciated.

Tbone

2tugboats

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2013, 05:29:16 »
Hello Tbone,

Soldering brass can be accomplished with both solder or silver solder.
I would recommend electrical solder as verse plumbing solder because
it has less acid in its mix.

In the ship yard, silver solder is used to solder pipes, usually copper/
nickel, together. Silver solder is much stronger than tin solder. And,
silver takes more heat.

I don't think you need silver solder. Maybe on propeller shaft mounts
or rudder parts. Soft solder works out fine for railings unless you spot
folks "tieing up" to your railings which is a no-no on any vessel.

Have a nice piece of metal to do your soldering on and be prepared to
use "what ever it talks" to hold your pieces together for soldering.
Clean up with a file, emery cloth, and a final polish with fine steel wool
and walla - perfect beautiful railings.

Don't forget to send pictures Tbone
Michael in Anacortes, Washington


 
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

west coast tug

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2013, 07:53:17 »
I usually make a jig to hold the rails while you solder them together, A flat piece of plywood with some saw cuts as the locations , yes It will burn up but will last 1 or 2 rails . When I make lots of rails the same I use a Aluminium sheet and cut it on the saw with the same blade as wood.
Some time I will put holes in the cross joint areas so the flame will travel through it.
With out making a jig your handrails will look like a drunk welder was at work .
I try and silver them together it takes more heat oxyacetylene works best ,But is more expensive to set up.
You will need a smaller than normal torch point for both set ups large flames heat too much of an area , think of spot welding there's not a lot of heat only at the point of working .
Gary

Dizzyman2011

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2013, 09:13:45 »
Hey bud all good advice here
A jig is always good spend five mins now and
You'll never remember it don't and you'll never forget how u could have spent
5 mins and your railings would have looked so much better
Also to add the solder is important but don't overlook cleaning the brass rod
Before you start work a good joint can be made quicker with less heat
And less solder run if the metal is clean I use wire wool
Never fails :)

2tugboats

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2013, 17:43:34 »
One main tip Tbone, that I didn't mention. If I could give you one
rule that will make your soldering go the way you want it, is to
not use too much heat. . .

Like cooking fish, it doesn't take much heat to cook a fillet. Same with
soldering. You are only talking about 600 degrees. Your oven, doing a
pizza at 425, is just 175 degrees less than the amount of heat
you need.

A "Pencil Torch" is plenty for very small railing demands. Heat the
thicker of the two pieces you are attaching, a bit more than the
thinnest. Touch the solder a slight touch. If the solder melts, in is alright,
you are through. It won't come apart. If it doesn't melt, just give a
tiny bit more heat and repeat.

You will become an expert after about 2 minutes. As my teacher told me,
"If a chimp could get over the smoke, they could solder". Well, maybe not
that easy, but I'll say that if I can do it, you can Tbone.

Break a leg and enjoy,
Michael in Anacortes, Washington
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

Kev30

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2013, 13:52:59 »
I agree with 2tugboats a small pencil flame is ideal and I suggest using solder paint it contains particles of soft solder in paste form, use it straight from the jar apply a little to the work-piece where you want it soldered up use the pencil flame burner and it flashes up round the joint lovely. Again what has been stressed before on this page make sure the work-piece has been well cleaned up beforehand.

Regards
Kevin

2tugboats

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2013, 14:40:46 »
There you are Tbone. The information you received here about soldering is "top drawer"
and will serve many others who take advantage of our "Model Tug Forum". And yes,
think of the filing, sanding, and steel wool shining as cleaning. Truly, make it thoughtful
and well done so that your copper or brass soldering joint is - "Immaculate", inside and out.

I want to thank you, Kevin, for recommending "Solder Paint". I have been soldering for
over 40 years and can't believe I haven't ran into solder paint. It sounds beyond perfect
for our tugboat model's railings, cranes, running gear, and many other small but required
fittings and all.

I have been invited to speak at the yearly meeting of the "Metal Boat Society" here in
my town. They expect me to deliver a 1 1/2 hour talk about pipes and piping systems
for small steel hulled sailboats and workboats. . .I hope to do well. Now though, thanks to
the Tug Forum here and Kevin's teaching, I will indeed know everything there is about
soldering pipes. Seriously, thank you Tug Forum for helping my tugboat life go along
a bit more smoothly.

Michael in Anacortes, Washington
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

west coast tug

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2013, 21:00:40 »
The one thing that makes a hand rail look good is not having the rails larger than scale ,Some models out there have rails 3 X the scale size and don't look good at all. Yes the large rail is easier to work with for some .
A model in 3/4" scale 3/32 Dia. is starting to look too big
A model in 1/2" should try and be less than 1/16" Dia.
3/8 would be about 3/64 Dia.
Most hand rails in life can be up to 1.5" Dia. ,But most are 1" on tugs .
Gary

Kev30

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2013, 13:58:17 »
I've just read this page and forgot to mention where I bought the solder paint from????? Its a company renowned in the UK for supplying model engineers with there bits and pieces based in the midlands "Reeves 2000" they also sell a silver solder paint. An article in model boats magazine years ago mentioned the soft solder paint but suggested using a soldering iron but in my opinion leaves solder on the work-piece unlike the pencil flame burner where it will flash around the joint. In my Bristol slang this would be a PROPER JOB!!!!!!
Again these are my views and is up to the individual to make there own mind up on what method they prefer to use, I gain my methods and ideas from model railway magazines etc etc and got the info regarding the soft solder paint from one of these magazines/ newsletters.
I would again stress about making sure the materials used in making your handrails are well cleaned before starting soldering together and make sure all joints are all fluxed up before applying heat from a blow-lamp.
regards

Kevin 
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 14:00:24 by Kev30 »

tbone

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2013, 19:52:41 »
Thanks for all the feedback/info guys. 
The solder paint sounds interesting, wonder where to get it locally or even within the USA; only places I can find it for sale is in the UK.

I'm not quite ready for railing work yet, just want to get geared up and be ready when that stage comes.

Kev30

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Re: Advice soldering brass rod
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2013, 13:08:18 »
Just been on ebay and all sorts of companies sell the solder paste on there not to sure about your side of the water but I was surprised how many do over here as people use it for fine repairs for metal or electric circuit boards etc
All the best in your search tbone

Regards
Kevin

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