Author Topic: General model boat fittings  (Read 4291 times)

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robin stobbs

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General model boat fittings
« on: October 26, 2013, 08:54:39 »
It's been raining here for the past two days so this gave me the excuse I needed to spend time browsing through various threads and came to the conclusion that not too many members make all their own model boat fittings.  We have no hobby shop within a few hundred miles of where I live and importing from the USA or UK is just too expensive - notwithstanding that so many of the models I have made require fittings that are simply not available commercially for size and/or shape.

So I thought I'd just do a little trumpet blowing and post a few pics of some of the fittings I've made over the years - by no means a comprehensive collection but perhaps of interest to some members.  Back in the late 1960s I bought my first little Unimat I lathe and then 20 years went and acquired their latest model.  It doesn't have a long bed length so turning hollow brass masts, for instance requires making a number of tapering sections which I then silver solder together.  Why hollow?  Well, so I can feed the + LED leads up through the mast and use the mast itself as the -ve lead.

So, to start with some fittings I made for some 1:200 scale bulk cargo ships and 1:20 scale outboards made for a museum display of motorised ethnic dugout canoes.  Look for more info on Hallam Venture and Ruth Venture on my website at  https://sites.google.com/site/stobbsfamily1/Home/some-model-pics---boats-1  and scroll down.

If anyone has any queries or want to know more please just 'shout'!

Robin
The problem is never how to get new, innovative thoughts into your mind, but how to get old ones out.  ~ Dee Hock ~.

robin stobbs

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2013, 09:03:27 »
Next lot are some 1:15 scale fittings made for a sea rescue launch.  I was able to spend some time on the prototype and took dozens of photographs (in the days when you actually used film and processed that in a darkroom and made prints to the size you wanted!).  For all the instruments I reduced the photographic image to the exact size I needed, cut out the panels and then superimposed clear plastic circles (or dome in the case of the compass) over the photo image.  The internal fittings were made from various bits an pieces of plastics, wood, etc.
The problem is never how to get new, innovative thoughts into your mind, but how to get old ones out.  ~ Dee Hock ~.

robin stobbs

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2013, 09:18:19 »
And now to a tug!  My model of CF Kayser to 1:32 scale.  I make all my portholes from turned brass with a clean-drilled hole through the centre.  I then turn down some 'Perspex' rod to the exact fit, cyano cut off sections into the brass 'ring' and then machine off the surfaces and polish using 'Brasso'. Volia, glazed waterproof porthole.

For cowl vents I use the electrolytic copper deposit method.  First make a wooden master which is then cast as a two-piece plaster-of-Paris mould.  Then I melt into this casting metal (I used to use Woods metal until this went off the market), lead will do but it melts at a higher temperature and the XYL doesn't like me casting lead in HER kitchen!!  Then clean up the casting metal master and suspend this in a copper sulphate bath and connected to the cathode (-ve) of a 2 to 6 volt supply (the lower the voltage the better the deposit).  To the anode you connect a bar or 'glob' of pure copper.  After about 48 hours you have a good thickness of copper deposited over your master.  Take it out, wash it, clean it up and melt out the casting metal ....!  Real scale-looking cowl vent!

Again, if anyone is interested in following this technique I can give more details.

Robin
The problem is never how to get new, innovative thoughts into your mind, but how to get old ones out.  ~ Dee Hock ~.

mike_victoriabc

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2013, 18:32:10 »
Hi Robin - pretty interesting stuff!

fittings are always a problem for some of us - doesn't matter where we live - hobby shops only stock so much.

We look forward to more posts and information on your work.

west coast tug

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2013, 18:58:47 »
If you want to improve your parts paint them with a lacquer based primer and sand them smooth before you make the silicone mold .
The other thing to do is try and vacuum the silicone to remove the air bubbles . A shop vac is not strong enough you need to get to -30 lbs vacuum.
Refrigerater supply places have these pumps. Vacumm Bell jar.
You will find out the details come out a lot better.
If you can not find the pump try a pressure cooker and compress the air to 15 lbs. with the mold in side this will make the bubbles a lot smaller .
Some fellows will make copies this way as well .


don't use an enamel based paint it will cross contaminate the silicone ,wont set up properly . White Gas will dissolve the silicone if problems happen.
Avoid using CA glues as well on the original , Epoxies work the best. automotive body filler works good.
Gary

west coast tug

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2013, 19:09:13 »
These are some of the parts I make for kits.

I use a product from Hydro Seal Polymers , Riverside Ca. USA.
HCNO 65D 240S Dark Grey , I get a 20 liter pail of each for about $600.00 Canadian
De mold's in 30 mins pot life @70 F is  2 min probably to fast for you , I only do small bits at a time .
Urethane is very strong when cured.
Don't use when below 50 F it becomes peanut brittle after making parts.
Gary 

Footski

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2013, 23:20:36 »
We really do have some talent out there. Very impressive indeed. I wish I had that level of skill. Model shops are also a rarity down here in the Deep South of Spain.
Barry

west coast tug

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2013, 07:39:06 »
The problem with the parts is we all make a different vessel , a different scale , a different type of country of origin and vintage .
Most parts that are from Europe are 1960's to 70's stuff. The parts that I make are for the log towers of the Fraser river  Canada.
I usually keep to 1/2" foot , But have some in 3/8 foot .
Gary

west coast tug

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2013, 08:10:29 »
When you start making parts that have a lot of details you will have to get a vacuum machine to suck the air out . Other wise you will be loosing details to air bubbles . As they are larger than some of the details.
These show some of the smaller detail stuff that I make.
Man hatches for deck openings, Hydraulic winch heads and Hand controls for them.
1/16, 1/2, 3/8 foot.
Gary

Model Tug Man

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2013, 03:56:42 »
Very impressed with your knowledge and quality of your work. I'm sure that there are Forum members who would be interested in purchasing parts from you. Also, do you do custom work to order? Will check out the link soon.

 cool
« Last Edit: October 31, 2013, 03:59:14 by Model Tug Man »
VGJQ

mike_victoriabc

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2013, 05:15:11 »
Those hatches open - nicely detailed.

Terence

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2013, 12:13:45 »
Another way of making small quantities of fittings is to use stereo-lithography ("SL").  Many 3D CAD programs such as SolidWorks now have an output which can be used to create plastic parts in relatively inxpensive SL machines.  But if you don't have the CAD software, skills, or inclination to buy a SL machine, there's probably plenty of designers that will be happy to do the drawings, and there are many SL facilities.  After all, they're most often used to make pre-production models for evaluation, so the one-offs are no problem.  The best machines produce models that can be painted as made; the models from the cheapest machines need a bit of fettling because the surface is ridged.  Parts can be made that are hollow, have undercuts, or other features that could be difficult to make by the average modelmaker. Again, some of the better machines and plastics can produce functional parts.
If you want to go the whole hog, there are scanners that will measure an object, including assemblies, and including hidden features, and the output can be fed directly to a SL machine.  But the scanners are over 1 million ...
personally, I still prefer to make bits on a conventional lathe and milling machine.

west coast tug

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Re: General model boat fittings
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2013, 22:03:57 »
The hatches were made on a duplicator machine by a friend , Details are laser-ed in negative and then copied to be positive.
You have to sand it a bit to cover over the string like lines of the machine .
Only the original is made on the machine the others are copied into urethane by a silicone mold  .
Gary