Author Topic: Fittings Scale vs MM?  (Read 2541 times)

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freightliner009

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Fittings Scale vs MM?
« on: January 19, 2014, 06:45:47 »
I've been looking around for fittings etc for my 1/24 scale Zeeland tug, most of the fittings are sized in MM. What MM size best represents 1/24 scale?

Flags are another thing, not just the size but what flags are usually flown and where are they placed? I think there's usually the tug company flag, tug nationality flag and if they are in foreign waters they fly that particular countries flag, is that correct? In which order?
Proud  father of a new Hobby Engine 1/35 scale Southampton tug and 1/24 scale hand crafted Zeeland tug

Sudbury II

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Re: Fittings Scale vs MM?
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2014, 13:25:11 »
This may help.....if not...Google

 http://jbwid.com/scalcalc.htm
"Suds"

des

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Re: Fittings Scale vs MM?
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2014, 14:57:03 »
G'day Andy

Ref mm scales and what size fittings to look for - it depends on what fittings you are looking for.  1:24 scale means you multiply the actual size of the model fitting by 24.  So something which is 25mm in actual size would scale out at 25 x 24 mm = 600 mm.  Or, if you are working in feet and inches, then divide 600mm by 25 mm to the inch, so 600 / 25 = 24 inches.

For example, most people average around 5' 6" to 6' in height, or around 1650 to 1800mm.  Divide these heights by 24 and you are looking for model figures around 69 to 75mm high.  Use the same procedure to estimate the size of a winch (for example), mooring bollards or bitts, anchors, binnacle, fairleads, lights, etc.

You should have some idea of what the real-world size of an object should be, then it's an easy calculation to decide on the size of the model fitting you need.  If  you don't have a first-hand idea of the sizes of these objects, then look up some photos on the web and try to form an impression of their size in proportion to something that you do know - e.g. the height of a door opening.  Or go down to the harbour with your camera.  (I often count the rungs of a ladder to estimate vertical height - e.g. of a mast or funnel casing;  each rung is about 300mm apart.)

It's also best if you have some idea of what the object should look like.   For instance an anchor windlass is vastly different from a towing winch or capstan.  And different drive options give different appearances - so a steam windlass looks different from an electric driven one, or a hydraulic driven one.  This is important for the era you want your boat to represent.  (A 1900's tug wouldn't have anything hydraulically driven, and a 2000's tug wouldn't have anything steam driven, except the galley urn.)

1:24 scale (imperial) is very close to 1:25 scale (metric) - the error is only 4%, with a metric scale item working out a little smaller than the same imperial scale item.  If you apply this to the rung spacing of a ladder, or to a shipping container, the difference would not be visually apparent even to the most die-hard river counter.  So I would treat them as interchangeable.  (My boat is 1:50 scale, but I use a lot of 1:48 model railroad detail fittings).

Have fun.

Des.


2tugboats

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Re: Fittings Scale vs MM?
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2014, 17:09:24 »
Well Andy, there you are. Suds gave a good link, I checked it out and it's perfect.
And thank you Des for your sharing. I wish I could have heard your simple line,
"1:24 scale means you multiply the actual size of the model fitting by 24." This line
stuck in my mind just fine.

Your telling about being aware of the surroundings to get a feel for the scale size
and all Des, is what I do a lot of. I build in large scale and so I can brows the shelves
of my local hardware store to find tugboat hardware. Not prefect, but close enough
for my sailing needs.



Great lessons and new ways to think of the basics here on the Forum. Thank you
for the questions and sharing of ideas here fellows.

Michael in Anacortes, Washington
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

freightliner009

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Re: Fittings Scale vs MM?
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2014, 11:36:24 »
Thanks for the replies, the items I am looking for are cleats, fairleads and fender tyres, the first two I don't think I have ever seen so gauging is difficult. As for the fender tyres, they are advertised in various sizes of MM but obviously can't get a feel for what is too big or small hence the original question.
Proud  father of a new Hobby Engine 1/35 scale Southampton tug and 1/24 scale hand crafted Zeeland tug

des

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Re: Fittings Scale vs MM?
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2014, 23:07:42 »

G'day Andy

Well, no-one else has jumped in with any advice here, so here we go again.

For tyres, most tugs use old truck tyres, so anything that scales out around 1350 - 1500mm (4'6" - 5'6") would be reasonable.  In your 1:24 scale, this would represent something around 55 - 65 mm diameter.

Fairleads need to accommodate the largest size rope likely to be passed through it.  For a full size tug this would rarely exceed about 80 mm diameter.  There are several types of fairlead commonly used - one consists of a simple circular or oval device which is welded into a hole through the bulwarks to prevent rope chafing.  The other type is more commonly seen on small boats and yachts, and consists of two arms cast onto a single base, with the arms bent toward each other, but leaving an opening to pass the rope through.  This type does not require the end of the rope to be passed and pulled through, as does the first device.  These open fairleads are usually welded or bolted to the deck (near a mooring port) or gunwales.  For an 80 mm rope (say 3 - 4 mm scale size on your boat) a circular or oval closed type of say 6 - 8 mm internal diameter would be appropriate, although you could go out to 10 - 12mm without being excessive;  for an open type, something about 10 - 15 mm overall length with a 4 - 6 mm throat would be appropriate (or up to around 50% bigger if you prefer) - but not many tugs would use these.

For cleats - do you really mean cleats?  Or do you mean mooring bollards or bitts?  These are all different fittings, used for much the same purpose.  But once again, cleats are more often used on smaller boats, yachts etc.  (Some cleats actually look very much like small bollards.)  If you like, send me a pm with a photo of something you'd like to use, and I'll see what I can do with it.

Des.

freightliner009

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Re: Fittings Scale vs MM?
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2014, 12:47:26 »
Cheers Des,

You hit the nail on the head mate, you have to see these things before you can judge the scale. I've never seen any of these bits so no amount of working out really makes any difference hence the original question.

Yep, I meant cleats, it's like two opposite fingers 180 degrees apart on a base, a bit like what you'd hold a washing line up with by doing a figure of 8 with the line around the cleat.
Proud  father of a new Hobby Engine 1/35 scale Southampton tug and 1/24 scale hand crafted Zeeland tug