Author Topic: Hull Paint  (Read 3401 times)

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freightliner009

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Hull Paint
« on: February 13, 2014, 07:14:25 »
I was reading a thread on here recently about hull paint, red oxide and how the actual colour of the red oxide had changed in some cases/brands.

If it is of any use to anyone in the UK I bought some red oxide last weekend to do my hull with. I got it in Wilko's (Wilkinsons), 500ml for around 4.65, really nice quality and viscosity and has gone on a treat, more's to the point it is actually the right red colour!
Proud  father of a new Hobby Engine 1/35 scale Southampton tug and 1/24 scale hand crafted Zeeland tug

west coast tug

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2014, 08:39:59 »
All the makers of the Oxide tend to be different colors, Tremclad over here is the best tone for it.
There is all sorts of Engine enamel paints that are different.
Hemple , International , Jotun, Manufactures for the big guys tend to follow a set tone color,
But there is some fellows that have light blue and a teal green sort of the Yacht worker had left over . The price was right stuff.
Black is now on the river .
Gary

model tugman

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2014, 08:57:06 »
 ^-^  freightliner 009. I have been using Wilco's red oxide for a long time now .if you need a gloss version try the doorstep and windowsill red it dries like glass in about 2 hours.their matt and gloss black is pretty good also  Geo
Tugs are for life      George B

freightliner009

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2014, 05:19:47 »
 ^-^ Model Tugman,

I will need the black too for the top par of the hull, I was going to use matt with a satin varnish as I thought it may look more realistic. A deep gloss is lovely but looks 'too new'.
I have some matt blackboard black coming, not sure of the quality of it yet but if it turns out not so good I'll go back to Wilco's and get theirs.

I'm using a satin polyurethane varnish and was wondering what the census is on the amount of coats to apply? I have applied two thick coats so far.

I did two cots of red oxide as it was nice and thick and the hull only needed a rub down for the paint to key to so it has plenty of protection paint wise but I'm never quite sure with varnish especially satin. At least with gloss you can see the depth of the gloss getting deeper as it dries the more coats that are applied but with satin you don't get that indication.
Proud  father of a new Hobby Engine 1/35 scale Southampton tug and 1/24 scale hand crafted Zeeland tug

Jarvo

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2014, 13:11:23 »
Hi Freightliner009

I have heard that Red oxide is not totally waterproof, not proved myself, but a couple of coats of stain will seal and protect the hull anyway.

Also been told that Grey primer is thicker that red oxide, so a coat of grey then red might be of help

Mark
Etherow Model Boat Club

Jarvo

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2014, 05:51:21 »
HI All

Seen various questions about the type of paint and manufacturer, this is all academic when you consider oxidation, and UV degradation. I use Simonize Acrylic both gloss, satin, matt with clear also available. price 2-99 from Europarts post free. Sorry to you stateside but the postage and customs would be a horrendous cost.

Good coverage and a nice colour. All comes down to price and availability.

Mark

Etherow Model Boat Club

2tugboats

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2014, 07:07:53 »
Right after the beautiful wood is just right. . .and the plastic is fitted together tight,
begins the world of tugboat painting possibilities. And the final consideration after
how well it marries with its foundation is how the finished tug will look to the eye
of the builder/owner and all others who view our handsome labor of love.

Oil or water base, acrylic or polyurethane, each has it characteristic demands and appeal
to the eye. It is possible to have the paint job create our tugboats portrayed spirit.
That is, age can be stated with rust touching and work boat scars. The colors radiate
the sign of a local marine company or the paint can suggest the tug being a ice breaker,
oil drilling platform, and even a yacht or cruise ship.

The cost of the paint is critical to many of us and even those of us who have money
to burn. For example, my financial empire, after some rent, utilities, car fuel, and food,
can be compared to just a notch above the poor fellow holding up the sign that says,
"Will work for food". Thus, an $8.00 dollar quart of varnish verses a $20.00 dollar quart
of varnish is a big deal. I truly believe that for our tugs, the eight dollar product will
do its magic beautifully and for ever.

I prefer oil base paint for anything that is going to be in the water. . .but I can't afford
it or the turpentine or the smell, or the task of getting rig of the cleaning juices and
fire prone cleanup rags. Water base is my lot. I do spring for some polythane clear
coat though as the last swipes of the brush on my tugboat dreams.



I just happen to have a shipyard down the street a few blocks that always has two or
three ships on the ways in various stages of construction. Red lead abounds on vessel
bottoms about the area. I used a color chart at my hardware store and mixed a
quart of brown/red "mat" finish. And, I painted all of my last tug with water base.
Inexpensive, fast, and very forgiving to work with.

That's my painting story. Just another day in tugboat paradise,
Michael
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

des

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2014, 00:13:50 »
Hi all

My kit-bashed AZIZ is my first attempt at RC model boat modelling.  I very quickly found out that model paints (Tamiya, Humbrol, Testors, etc) are very expensive per litre (gallon).  I subsequently used automotive acrylic lacquers and clear-coat in spray packs, available from my local auto store with colours mixed on-site to my requirements.  Much cheaper, but even so, at one coat = 1 can, the cost soon mounted up.  I shudder to think what it would have cost if I had used model paints.

Des.

Calimero

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2014, 10:49:19 »
While googling around I recently stumbled onto a "graffiti / street art" site that sells spray cans.

At the local home improvement shop each 400ml can hovers around 10-14 EUR. The bill for my Odin has been pretty harsh so far.

On those "street art" (vandalism ?) sites 400ml cans go for about 3-4 EUR. They also have "high pressure" cans to cover wide areas. I don't know what that paint is worth. But I might give it a shot as it would be 3-4 times cheaper that what I used so far.

On the other end of the spectrum I've also found 2-component spray cans with high(er) resistance automotive paint. They're supposed to offer great coverage and give you a tough finish because the two component somehow react as a glue (think epoxy) and harden.
Downside is that can has to be used at once (once both components are mixed pot life is a few hours). The other downside is of course the price: around 20EUR per 400ml can.

A 1.20m*0.40m barge would require a lot of paint. On the one hand that street art cans look tempting at 4 bucks each. On the other hand tougher 2K paint would probably outlast the basic acrylic paint.

Might have to ask a car body shop if they'd be willing to do the painting for me ...

Jarvo

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2014, 01:19:23 »
HI Mate

I see you are in Paris, last time i was over there, (on a coach tour) i noticed several small car repair yards, don't know where we were at the time but do you have yellow pages for the phone, search round go and talk to them.

My local repair shop thinks I'm mad but is quite happy to spray my hulls and superstructure, he only charges me for the paint, usually leftovers from other jobs.

I do all the sanding and prep work, that would cost a lot more for them to do it.

A pro paint jod with good paint will always be better than 'rattle cans' for big hulls a lot cheaper to.

Hope this helps

Mark
Etherow Model Boat Club

Calimero

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Re: Hull Paint
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2014, 02:05:42 »
Small body shops are getting kicked out (gentrification !). But I could probably still find some guys willing to do it. Or I could have it done in Alsace.

But yeah it sounds more reasonable both in terms of finish, toughness and cost.