Author Topic: Schottel azimuth drive control  (Read 5930 times)

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romanov

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Schottel azimuth drive control
« on: June 11, 2014, 23:06:05 »
Hello
I'll be trying on the construction of the model-driven Schottel azimuth.
I have a question:
  whether it is somewhere electronics control scheme for controlling the drive? I'm interested in everything about it. I know that there are ready-made solutions but to me they are too expensive. I thought to myself perform such a solution to control the azimuth drive.

Regards
Roman

2tugboats

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2014, 04:32:40 »
Hello Roman,

Good question. . .I have found the perfect set-up for my tug. Dependable,
balanced mechanically and electrically, and install and go. However, I have
also found the pricing for twin drives to be six to a thousand dollars for
the just the running gear. Another four to eight hundred for the RC setup.

I tried to use automatic "pocket key controls", used model big wheel truck
controls and fittings, and there is, for those who can figure it out, computer
"WIFI" to coffee maker and thermostat switches. I am sure there are more
dead ends about.

I haven't given up though. There are many very clever tugboat fellows
around the Forum here and I will watch your replies carefully.

I hope the very best for your tugboat engineering Roman,
Michael
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

Calimero

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2014, 05:20:18 »
There's an integrated board from IMTH available for 105EUR You'd need two of them for twin drives obviously.

I don't think the price is unreasonable considering:
- board offers all the required features
- professional built

If you want to make it from scratch yourself to learn electronics, go ahead. I personally would like to learn Arduino programming (have a "basic kit" on the way from eBay) and building a Schottle controller would be a nice project. Not the first one obviously.

But if the plan is to get your boat running and not spend hundreds of hours learning and building, IMTH's controller probably won't be much more expensive than a custom built system.


romanov

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2014, 22:35:04 »
Hello
I saw this set for 105 euros. It's a solution.
But I miss the voyeuristic possibilities there in what position is the axis of the drive.
Controlling this is important especially when you want to take part in the competition.
Electronics is not difficult, and I have already some experience.
I hope that answered the call to people who have already tried the same thing I do and have already some experience.
It was interesting that the joint project here in the forum.

Roman

pinpinfou

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2014, 22:38:18 »
Hello

You have the SEAPOD system which is absolutely complete and which uses a normal radio without any modification.
Everything is cabled, there is just to connect 5 grips and it is functional.
No weld to be made, any regulation except the zero point the first time.
Everything is automatic

The price is 129 euros but it is plug & play , No possible error


romanov

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2014, 23:23:03 »
Helo

Can I ask for more data ?

Romanov

Deckie

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2015, 03:11:57 »
Hello

You have the SEAPOD system which is absolutely complete and which uses a normal radio without any modification.
Everything is cabled, there is just to connect 5 grips and it is functional.
No weld to be made, any regulation except the zero point the first time.
Everything is automatic

The price is 129 euros but it is plug & play , No possible error



Looks like a good setup, but i've been watching this and trying to find a point of sale for a while, no such thing seems to exist?????

Taz

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2019, 23:34:03 »
An old thread I know, but has there ever been any further progress on this?
Visit the "Boulder Creek Tramway" at: www.smex.net.au/bouldercreek

Volker

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2019, 00:47:44 »
There is still the IMTH system. It is available in two versions now, Basic and Extended. Basic is for use with the joystick, Extended for use of the company's Copilot.
Basic: https://www.imth.de/index.php/en/categories/product/view/1/1
Extended: https://www.imth.de/index.php/en/categories/product/view/1/57
Copilot: https://www.imth.de/index.php/en/categories/product/view/1/59

The Copilot was especially designed for the Graupner MC32 transmitter but can be adjusted to other Graupner transmitters with some tinkering. As the Copilot is a mechanical attachment I don't know if it will fit other manufacturer's transmitters.

Here both systems are shown in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIPS4sZIV40

Though the IMTH board is distributed by Graupner also it works with all transmitters.

There were some other systems on the market for a short time like from Kagelmacher or rc-schottel.ch but they disappeared.
Regards, Volker

Taz

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2019, 15:47:37 »
Thanks for the reply,

The IMTH system with the Copilot looks interesting however it appears to be a little clunky just using the stick. I could be wrong but it looks as though he has to set the throttle speed before any steering can happen and then the throttle speed is set??? I could be wrong though???
If I'm looking at the setup correctly I'll be up for about 1600 - 1700EUR for a twin ASD setup (transmitter, receiver, Copilot, electronics, and servos)!!!!!!!!

So I'm now wondering now just how much "serious" interest there really is in these ASD transmitters?
I run a small engineering business and a lot of my work is for an electronics business. The design and build electronics for underwater ROV's (remote operated vehicles / submersibles) and the fish farming and mining industry.
I spoke to them about coming up with an ASD control system and they seem to think that it would be a relatively simple electronic circuit to design and build if I could do the machining work for the transmitter mechanics (similar to the full scale control on and ASD tug).

The idea would be to machine a complete "bolt in" gimble replacement for a new transmitter. Something like a Turnigy X9.
Cheap, and yet a reasonably good transmitter for our purpose, programable and with plenty of spare channels for other functions.
The receiving circuit would plug directly into the receiver with no further modifications and would drive a simple stepper motor similar to those used on bench top cnc routers and 3D printers.

So I'm wondering how much interest there would be in a complete "ASD radio package" if this could be bought for a reasonable price - roughly a 3rd of the cost of the IMTH???
The package would come complete with a new Turnigy X9 fitted with twin ASD control hubs, X9 receiver, two stepper motors and two stepper motor driver circuits.
All that would be required to connect the stepper motor drive to the ASD unit would be a simple toothed belt with a magnetic sensor located on the ASD to for the circuit to "home" on initial start up.

The transmitter controls would consist of the normal gimble "sticks" being replaced with a rotating hub with an integral throttle lever. The hubs would rotate 360 degrees (continuously - meaning you could keep spinning them around in one direction without having to rotate them back the other way to zero them) and the direction of the propeller would be the same direction that the hub on the transmitter is facing.

If anyone is seriously interested, please PM me and let me know!
Visit the "Boulder Creek Tramway" at: www.smex.net.au/bouldercreek

des

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2019, 21:52:50 »
Hi Taz

I'm in Adelaide, and I have also looked at twin ASD setups for a couple of models.  I note that your estimate of 1600 - 1700 Euros does not include the cost of the Schottels themselves - say another USD 300 or so by the time we get them to Oz.  And then if you want brass props ...

I've decided that this is just too expensive, so I've gone for traditional props within fixed nozzles, with rudders.  Everything relatively simple, straight out of the box, for a fraction of the cost.

Des.

Taz

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Re: Schottel azimuth drive control
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2019, 22:11:40 »
Hi Des,

Yes, you are correct, my estimate didn't include the cost of the actual drives.
As you probably know, there are a few different places selling the drives now so I figured a system that was able to be used to control any of the "off the shelf" drives would be the best solution.
I'm building my own drives fully machined in stainless steel complete with 150mm diameter brass propellers and needed a stand alone system to control them effectively, powerful enough to cope with the loads and weight. Stepper motors seemed like the obvious solution.

My thoughts are that if there is a simple and effective system available to control these for a realistic price, then people will be more inclined to build ASD vessels.

Taz.
Visit the "Boulder Creek Tramway" at: www.smex.net.au/bouldercreek