Author Topic: Slipway ASSURANCE class model  (Read 28456 times)

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tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2015, 09:24:03 »
Thanks for that Calimero!!

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2015, 20:18:52 »
Working on decks. Fitting them is well,, not fun, but nearly there.

model tugman

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2015, 04:33:39 »
Nice one tug, you are really getting on with her now,  well done  Geo
Tugs are for life      George B

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2015, 15:55:08 »
That rudder setup is a patience tester eh?

Model Tug Man

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2015, 05:40:21 »
Enjoying your build. Keep those pictures coming.
VGJQ

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2015, 08:26:55 »
Sort of working around the edges while I wait for the motor and coupling, electrics etc. Have the rudder fitted now, works fine, decks fitted but not put down yet. Should have all the above stuff this week.

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2015, 15:51:52 »
I put in an email to Slipway for clarification as to how the prop and shaft go together as there is NO guidance at all in the instructions. I was pointed towards a couple of threads at mayhem and a couple of Flicker pictures but really her description of sequence of parts made more sense than all the others. Like most things, everyone on a thread has a slightly different way of doing things which mostly adds to the confusion. Seems like a thing that should be given as least cursory coverage in the instructions. This is not like putting a prop on a real boat which I have done many times working in shipyards etc. A different approach is required here.

This is what I was told was the proper drill.

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2015, 16:47:45 »
Got the motor and coupling today!  Been working on superstructure to pass the time. Here is some pix of progress.

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2015, 16:50:19 »
Got the shaft glued in quickly and ready to line up the motor. Love that big prop!  The little one inch plastic prop on my Dumas tug is puny by comparison, though it moves that boat along pretty well regardless.

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #24 on: February 27, 2015, 22:27:07 »
Got the Viper Marine 20 ESC today ( Slipway recommended) so got that wired up after changing out connectors for the motor and the battery to ESC. Got the servo roughed in. I see I am needing a longer servo arm, jury rigged one up to get an idea how long I need. Got it coming. This being only my second go at RC, I was a little apprehensive about the ESC, my only other was the DuraTrax in the Dumas tug. But the Viper got started right off without apparent issues, I think. Using the same RX, TX setup as on the other tug, a Futaba 3ch rig. Its simple and works fine with the other and Slipway said it would work fine here as well, so stick with what I sort of know. See about finding a place for everything over the weekend and hopefully get back to the boat soon.

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2015, 20:48:27 »
Getting a little paint on in places.  Sequence is tricky. Am doing things a bit out of sequence both for convenience and was waiting for electrics etc. Started to glue down the flybridge and put the top on the PH and went WHOA!  Get those little bitty windows fitted first. Glad I did, a bit of a pain is it.  The green and grey are pretty dark, but look somewhat lighter in natural light. Battery boxed in, motor bed built etc.

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2015, 12:21:11 »
Spent a fair amount of time cutting out and filing, sanding those little stanchions for the fly bridge. Somewhat akin to making toothpicks by hand! Of course after handling and gluing the little buggers into place, and combined with other work going on, I will have to do a lot of paint repair on the PH. The side light boxes will not be let into the corners of the bridge per the plans, instead will be glued to the side of the wing wall. There is some precedent for this. In one of my books it shows W96 so fitted. I will then place the wing supports under the wings instead of under the light boxes. Yes, this does amount to laziness on my part but I just cannot see cutting into the corners of the bridge. I have already had to re-glue the whole thing a couple of times due to stressing things. Lots of little parts!

model tugman

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2015, 14:30:39 »
AAh the joys of modelling tug.
Tugs are for life      George B

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #28 on: March 06, 2015, 20:33:41 »
For sure model tugman!

 After that little exercise I was in no mood to whittle out the narrow strips off the printed styrene for the bridge caps, so having a bit of balsa laying about from a school project for my boy, I found just the right size of some strips and cut and glued them down instead, then stained them for finish. They turned out pretty well and it was a lot less work.
Put a longer servo arm on the steering servo and it gave me a lot more rudder on each side than what I started with.

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Slipway ASSURANCE class model
« Reply #29 on: March 08, 2015, 18:43:53 »
Worked on the PH top and the little brass stanchions and caps, balsa again. Much easier to work with than the printed styrene sheet pieces. Wont be as durable of course but oh well, easily repaired or replaced. If it was going to be left out in the rain well plastic of course is better. It wont be. Spent  beau coup time trimming, fitting, bending and gluing the little buggers down, then cut and fitted the caps. I actually got a half decent solder job on the forward joints too. If you saw my hideous solder work on the Dumas tug, you know this is a big improvement! I only did that part with solder though, the rest is glued. The stern (over the rudder) hatch has me somewhat flummoxed as to its construction. The drawing is a bit vague and there is no good picture of how it goes together or how it goes down. Gonna have to look over other builds I guess.