Author Topic: NZ tug Koraki  (Read 19817 times)

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sea monkey

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NZ tug Koraki
« on: July 31, 2015, 19:03:01 »
My last project the Mark I SDM, had barely left the bench when I started on this one: the tug Koraki.
The Koraki is a small (21m) coastal tug buit in New Zealand in 1986. It has had a very busy worklife and has worked out of just about every port in the country, mostly towing barges. Currently it is ferrying barges of cement 24/7 between Auckland and the new refinery being built in Whangarei.
For a while in the 1990s it worked out of my town, Wellington, and it was the subject of my first attempt at scratch-building. I was lucky enough to get some plans from the builders' yard and made a basic model for my sons room. Not sure what possessed me to make this particular boat at the time but its a tough looking little tug and the yellow looks good.
Twenty years later Ive decided to rebuild it, static only. The Koraki has changed a bit since 1995 and was never built exactly as the original plans depicted. I still had the plans so I contacted the current owners and was able to go aboard and get plenty of photographs. The owners were very heplful. The boat has had a few changes over the years and Ill build it as it is now only not so knocked around.
At 1/50 it is tiny 420mm LOA. Ive always built at 1/50 so Ill stick with it. Wish my first models had been at a larger scale then I wouldnt be locked into the fiddly small stuff at this size. Could be a slow build, unlike George's turbo builds but I'll try to make regular updates.

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2015, 19:14:48 »
Here she is at work.
Taking cement barges up the coast to Whangarei.
Salvage work on the MV Rena
and lining up for the annual Auckland tug races
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 23:54:06 by sea monkey »

tugnut

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2015, 21:10:33 »
She is a great looking tug looks like its done some work to.
Thanks for pictures , do you no the name of the old tug in the background .
regards John b
john b

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2015, 22:33:27 »
That's the William C Daldy from the Maritime Museum in Auckland. Named after William Crush Daldy, an Auckland politician (Crush what a great name for a politician. Built in 1935 by Lobnitz in Renfrew, Scotland for the Auckland Harbour Board. She has a bollard pull of about 17 tons, and is fired by two coal-burning boilers.
One of her finest moments was in 1958, when she preserved one of the pre-assembled main sections of the Auckland Harbour Bridge (then just being constructed over the Waitemata Harbour) from being damaged or lost in a major storm. Strong winds had come up as a construction barge was floating the 1,200 ton structure section into place, and manoeuvring boats were unable to keep it under control. The William C Daldy took up station and kept up the pull for over 36 uninterrupted hours before the wind subsided, burning 40 tons of coal.
In 1977, the vessel was to be scrapped, but was bought and restored by a local steam preservation society she's still going strong. 

VANYA

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2015, 02:00:50 »
Hi Steve,

This is the other big Sea Tow Tug to go with my barge. Think it is 33m LOA and about 1/3rd the length of the barge. Twin
VANYA

tugnut

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2015, 07:53:56 »
Many thanks very interesting, lovely looking old tug

regards John B
john b

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2015, 15:31:28 »
John: the dally was replaced by the Aucklander a classic 60s tug. The last steam tug built for NZ. It's a great looking tug and on my to do wish list . Unfortunately no plans and very few photos available.

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2015, 15:33:39 »
Hayden: that's a powerful looking beast. Haven't seen that one before, is it working out of Aus?
Steve

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2015, 15:50:54 »
First job: Drew up the keel and hull ribs and had them laser cut out of 3.6mm ply.
Quick and easy and much more accurate than I could get by hand. Everything just slots together.
In the late 1980s I met an old bloke who had made a model schooner in 1914 (when he was 14) and he made the whole thing out of a single 6"x6"x6' piece of black oak. Had to saw it into planking, mast, ribs, etc and also turn and carve all of the equipment from the one plank. The model still exists he had just got it back from a great nephew to restore it. Makes me realise how easy we have it these days with easy access to materials and high tech tools.
As this model is static only, I wont need to get inside the hull so the ribs are solid and they are twice as many as I would use if I needed room for motors and electronics. etc.
I made a simple jig from MDF and Lego to hold the keel staight and true. Spacers keep the ribs parallel and at 90 to the keel.

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2015, 16:17:36 »
With the 1.5mm ply deck attached the carcase is very solid and feels almost bulletproof. Would have been ideal to make a hull mould at this stage hindsight is always 20/20.
The deck has the bulwark support bases already laser cut, ready to drop in the laser cut supports.
This is the cleanest, tidiest you'll ever see my bench. Don't know why I can't keep it like that all the time.

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2015, 16:19:11 »
Packed out the bow and stern sections with basswood and sanded them and the rib edges into shape to accept 1.2mm ply hull sheeting. This is the easy part where things seem to progress quickly.

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2015, 17:13:03 »
Drew up a pattern for the topmost chine and cut it out of thin cardboard. I used this for checking the size and alignment, and then cut the final section from 1.2mm ply. I'm sure you've all done this before.
I did the top chine in 4 segments: bow, stern and 2 sides. That gave the lower edge of the chine a nice clean line. It overlapped a bit at the deck but that was easily sanded down to deck level.
The rest of the hull was done in the same manner.

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2015, 17:15:16 »
The section where the bow meets the keel was a very complex curve and I couldn't form it out of 1 piece of ply. Can usually do this with layers of 0.5mm or 0.8mm ply but not this time. Had to do it in short sections and sand the joins flush. Not ideal but that's what filler is for.
 

sea monkey

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2015, 17:18:57 »
Happy with the basic form. Starting to look like it should now a very solid, muscular hull.
This is a few weeks work condensed.
Now resin, sand, undercoat, sand, fill, sand and repeat about 10 times.
I actually enjoy this part, there's always a tiny bit that needs fixing.

VANYA

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Re: NZ tug Koraki
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2015, 17:31:57 »
Steve,
Really like your consruction and all those sections make for a good strong hull. When you laser cut the sections do you design cut out pieces to allow internal access and reduce a bit of weight?

I will dig out the Koranui drawing which came off the SeaTow website before they closed up shop. I think the vessel went to Australia and then was sold off up to the Middle East. Maybe the Tug forum or shipspotters might help to track its whereabouts down.

She is a chunky vessel and often did trans-tasman voyages with 10,000 tonnes of coal for power station generation. Made a few trips into Timaru to load silica sand for glass manufacturing in Auckland and also to collect old Leibher cranes with the big barge for Nelson and Bluff.

I have the barge, just need the tug.

Hayden
VANYA