Author Topic: SS Moonlight, Restoration  (Read 4445 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Tiny69

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
Re: SS Moonlight, Restoration
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2016, 08:31:12 »
Update 7: 15/02/2016

I have been concentrating on preparring the superstructure for a fresh coat of paint. The top coat of varnish was sanded back and the wheelhouse and painted black areas were masked off before a diluted mix of half white/half brown acryllic was airbrushed over the superstructure. Then a top coat of Humbrol No. 9 Brown was applied.

Now the areas either side of the steps were masked off and given two coats of matt black and the treads dry brushed with silver to add some wear and tear. The wheelhouse window frames and roof were then hand painted with Humbrol No. 10 Dark Brown. New coal bunker boards were made by cutting 8mm wide strips of 3mm thick balsa and cut to length. At each end a hand hole was cut into the board and a brass rod inserted.

Each board was then stained with a mahogany varnish along with the two wooden doors. The freshly varnished name board and brass plaque was then glued back in place on the front of the superstructure.

2tugboats

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 609
  • Roughly 3/4 inch scale semi accurate
    • Two Tugboats
Re: SS Moonlight, Restoration
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2016, 19:38:22 »
Thank you Tiny. . .what a wealth of ideas for me to choose from for my
next tugboat. As you describe your work, I see that if I just take a little
more time and effort, my results will be worth the extra fitting and sanding.

Looking over your pictures, I imagine making my steps and railings as
perfectly aged and true as you. Even close to your work would be great.

Thank you for extra fine "Tugboat Show & Tell" here on the Forum,
Michael
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

Tiny69

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
Re: SS Moonlight, Restoration
« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2016, 23:57:52 »
Michael,

I am glad that you find my restoration log informative and you are inspired to take a little more time and effort to improve your own work.

Regards

Tiny
« Last Edit: February 21, 2016, 10:45:13 by Tiny69 »

Tiny69

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 241
Re: SS Moonlight, Restoration
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2016, 10:46:00 »
Update 8: 21/02/2016

The first item to make was the replacement Liferaft container which had gone missing from the model.  First a 25mmOD brass tube was cut to a length of 30mm and then heated and pressed into some 2mm thick plastic sheet to form the two ends of the container. Then to form the moulded parts of the container 2.5mm half round plastic strip was glued in place.   The stand was then made from plastic sheet and square sections glued together.

Next a new rear ladder was made from brass, replacing the old broken plastic one.  The two sides were cut from some 5mm wide brass strip, marked with the positions of the steps and drilled.  Then I made a wooden jig to hold the sides and steps together whilst everything was soldered together.  The mounting brackets were soldered in place at the top and bottom.

On top of the wheelhouse I discovered that a binnacle had been added in some of the photo's I had found.  To start with a square 15 x 15mm of 2mm plastic sheet was cut with a second square 10 x 10mm of 1mm plastic cut and glued centrally on top to form the base.  Then a tube 5mm OD was cut 35mm long and glued on top of the base.  Using the lathe the top section was turned from 8mm OD brass bar and inserted into the top of the brass tube.  To finish off the brackets and metal balls were made and glued to the binnacle.

Behind the skylight an aerial is fitted which is made from some brass and copper tube sections slotted together with a solid brass bar slotted into the top.  These were soldered together and the two aerials soldered in place to form a cross mounted at 45 degrees.  Then the bracket for the third aerial was bent to shape and soldered in place.  The third aerial was made from 0.5mm OD brass rod cut to length, taped down onto a piece of wood, soldered together and then soldered onto the bracket.