Author Topic: Steam Tug Acacia  (Read 1600 times)

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Graham D

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Steam Tug Acacia
« on: January 29, 2016, 23:09:58 »
I have recently completed a scratch built tug based loosely on the Australian tug Wattle. Hence the name Acacia.
It is 750mm in overall length being approximately 1/32 scale.
I was very pleased with the maiden voyage, ie it didn't sink or roll over, and I would now like to add some crew figures.
My question to those in the know, is what form of clothing did crew wear from this era ? Did they wear overalls and if so what was the normal preferred colour ? Any advice would be appreciated.
Cheers
Graham

« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 19:25:47 by Graham D »

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Steam Tug Acacia
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2016, 10:21:43 »
Nice job!  What is the connection between Wattle and Acacia, since Acacia is a tree.  Also, 75mm is only about 3 inches,  Did you mean 755 mm???
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 10:23:46 by tug-arlyn-nelson »

Graham D

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Re: Steam Tug Acacia
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2016, 19:34:37 »
Good spotting, I meant 750 mm (Clumsy fingers).
Wattle is a common type of tree in Australia belonging to the Acacia family. A bit abstract I must admit.
My tug is 'similar' to Wattle but not intended to be a true scale model.
It has just had it's second voyage and chugs along nicely at a scale looking speed on 2/3 throttle with a bit in reserve if I wanted to do some towing. These old girls were never very fast and probably weren't capable of pulling too much weight either.
Cheers
Graham

tug-arlyn-nelson

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Re: Steam Tug Acacia
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2016, 20:04:40 »
I think we should see some video of it underway.

Graham D

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Re: Steam Tug Acacia
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2016, 00:05:47 »
No video I'm afraid and I wont get back to our club lake for a couple of weeks.
Here is a slightly over exposed  shot of a couple of crew I have managed to press gang into service.
They were farm hands that I have modified for a more nautical look.
The second shot shows the simple inside workings. 6 volt SLA battery feeding the little 12volt 550 motor which in turn turns the prop shaft via a 2 to 1 reduction double belt drive. Prop is a Graupner 45mm. I was amazed to discover this set up draws only 1.5 amps at full throttle, it should run for hours.
Cheers
Graham
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 01:28:33 by Graham D »

sea monkey

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Re: Steam Tug Acacia
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2016, 14:13:47 »