Author Topic: Ship's boats  (Read 3867 times)

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Toby

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Ship's boats
« on: August 15, 2016, 20:26:08 »
My project continues with Danube V/VI and like most modelers always have a couple of aspects going for we all have to wait for glue or finishing resin or paint to dry before proceeding. Whilst waiting for the rudder to dry before priming  and then adding riveting to it i have turned my attention to the ship's boats.

These for my boat appear to be clinker double-bow ed boats and working on the size of 9 1/2".

Shape:
On the steam tug boats of the thirties were the bow posts vertical and with a rounded corner to the keel spar or were the posts obliquely angled.

Colour scheme:
I have seen on one of the Danube tugs such boats with red coating below the waterline but as this was a late photograph  I assume that the ship's boats would originally have been white on the outside.
For the inside would this have been white or a cream.
Fittings
Would there have been polished wood. Interior construction seats floor planks etc. The floor wooden planks or wooden or metal grating?
Would the metal fittings for oars etc have been brass or iron.

Were these boats tiller-less or had a tiller.

Was the name of the tug painted on the bow or painted onto a plaque then fastened to the boat or engraved into boat or plaque.

Regards
Toby


« Last Edit: September 26, 2016, 19:12:08 by Toby »

Gerhardvienna

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2016, 06:34:38 »
Hi Toby

Maybe this link to the Royal museums greenwich will help you out:
http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/67477.html

Regards
Gerhard

2tugboats

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2016, 08:08:08 »
Toby, your first paragraph pretty well described my morning painting chains
and parts so they will be dry for there next step.

As I read your request for information about your model tug's boats. I assumed
someone here on the Forum would just write you the shapes and name places
that you seek. And then I read Gerhard's simple and very much to the point
recommendation to just go to the Royal Museum and see a picture of a model
like your project; a picture worth a thousand words.

Only here on the Forum can I see a set of questions answered so perfectly.
Thank you Toby and Gerhard for working it out so well, I learned much
also.

Michael
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

Gerhardvienna

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2016, 10:10:06 »
Hi Michael

That`s how I do it always. Watch out for the museum`s pages, there are so much hints to find. In my " other life" I plan a 1:50 scale model of the prussian SMS DANZIG, searching since over 5 Years.  So I`ve got a lot of expirience in searching out for things, and why not share them to others.

Regards
Gerhard

model tugman

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2016, 10:30:39 »
The Danube tugs boats were painted white,and kept covered at all times with gray canvas covers,and the were wooden clincher built when first built but in later life they had steel boats.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2016, 10:32:47 by model tugman »
Tugs are for life      George B

model tugman

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2016, 10:31:46 »
Another picture and an early black and white with the wooden boats.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2016, 10:34:22 by model tugman »
Tugs are for life      George B

Toby

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2016, 19:11:25 »
Hallo Gerhard,
Vielen dank für ihre Nachricht und Link zur Website an das Schifffahrtsmuseum Greenwich.


Das war sehr nett von Ihnen!


Leider es scheint mir das es ist kein sog Schiff's modell gebaut wann die originale war. 

Das Modell ist einfach und klein und leider ist es nicht ein sehr genaues Modell wann man es zu Fotos vergleicht. Schade, für es natürlich ein
hübsch Modell ist , aber gerade nicht zuverlässig; das Detail welche ich suche, gerade ist nicht da.



 Im Text aus des Museums es heißt es dass das Modell es unbekannter Herkunft ist usw.



Jedenfalls,  für beobachtet! 

Durch die Art und Weise wie kamen Sie auf diese Informationen?


Alles Gute


Toby



Hello Gerhard and Michael,


Thank you for the message and website link. 

That was very kind of you and thank you for taking the time to let me know about it. 


It was very interesting. 

Unfortunately it seems that it is not a  so-named ship's model,  the type built certainly of famous ships.


The model is simple and small and is not very accurate generally when compared with photos.

It is a pityfor it is apretty model but just not reliable;  the details i would like to have sewn are not there.

In the text is states that the model is of unknown origin etc. 


Anyhow, well spotted by you!  By the way, just how did you come across the information?


Thank you again. Much appreciated! 

Glad I am not alone in my first paragraph Michael
Toby

 

Toby

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2016, 19:22:46 »
George
Delightful photos. Lovely sense of period atmosphere. Summer halcyon days one would think.

So no tiller appears to be shown.  I cannot see attachments as though tiller wad stored under the canvas until required.  Name of the tug does not seem to be replicated in the ship's boats.

White on the outside but what about inside?  All painted wood or all painted except for perhaps varnished wood seats,  capping. Grating or paled floor?

model tugman

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2016, 22:59:53 »
Hi Toby . Painted inside with the same colour as the main casing brown. rudder and oars stored under the canvas.all very basic as working on the river and estuary they probably hoped never to use them.
I remember when I was younger on my 13th birthday actually, My Dad who was chief engineer on a tug at the time was standing by as the tug was having a refit at Ramsgate, and they lifted the lifeboats into the water alongside and they actually sank, where they had been in the davits for years alongside the hot funnel and in the summer sun all the seams. And planking had dried out, that was a bit of a shock to a young lad at the time, it was not until I was a bit older that I learnt that on ships at sea with wooden boats ,the norm was to keep water in them at all times to keep them tight,
Geo.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2016, 23:03:17 by model tugman »
Tugs are for life      George B

Gerhardvienna

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2016, 23:07:01 »
Hi Toby

I just found that by typing "Tugboat Danube V/VI" at google. The builder of the model is named as "Unknown" , but I expect the model as a shipyard model for the future owner, made by Cochrane and sons. Maybe I`complete wrong with that, here comes the text from the museum

"Scale: 1:48. Builder's full hull model representing the 'Danube V' and 'Danube VI' (both 1935), tugs. It is a superb model of a perennially popular subject among modelmakers, particularly among working model enthusiasts. The example here is very fine with its gold-plated fittings, applied penwork to the superstructure, intricately made fittings and virtually flawless paintwork. The ‘Danube V’ and ‘Danube VI’ were designed for the Tilbury Contracting and Dredging Company for their own business, and built by Cochrane & Sons, Selby, and measured 110 feet in length and just over 240 gross registered tons. Both tugs were a common sight on the River Thames and approaches to it. During the Second World War ‘Danube V’ towed the Mulberry Harbour units and ‘Danube VI’ took part in the D-Day landings. Both tugs became the property of Westminster Dredging Ltd., in 1965, and were scrapped three years later in Belgium.
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/67477.html#5Cieu53XqEpsdKl5.99 "

Most of that models were made for the reason of just showing the owners what they will get, and for their offices to let the customers know what the owners do.

Best regards
Gerhard

model tugman

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2016, 23:59:03 »
Pictures of the model that Gerhard is referring too, as he says it is probably the builders model to give an impression of the tug ,rather than looking at drawings.
Tugs are for life      George B

Toby

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2016, 18:16:54 »
Hello George.

I have uploaded the photos for reference albeit add having built this model yourself there are a number of things which appear not to tally with that line drawing or the photos we have observed. This is why to date I had thought that this was a general model donated rather than it being The shipsmodel as we generally associate with drawing office/shipyard models.

No fly bridge being the first 'omission'.

Anyhow they will be useful  as all input helps to confirm or deny model matters.
A close-up of the rudder mechanism along the deck would have mem interesting.

Re the rudder on the life boats did the rudder have the pins and the boat have hoops in which the pins dropped into our visa -versa.

Toby

Toby

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2016, 18:20:11 »
The bit about the lifeboat must have been a shock to you. I wonder how long before you dared jump in a boat after that.

I never knew water was kept in the life boat to maintain the planks tightness.

T

model tugman

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2016, 02:40:00 »
there is no rule of thumb about the rudder pointless as I have seen them both ways.
Tugs are for life      George B

Gerhardvienna

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Re: Ship's boats
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2016, 00:23:57 »
Hi Toby

Here I found more about the Danube - named tugs, hope it helps!
http://thamestugs.co.uk/T--C---and--D--LTD.php

Regards
Gerhard