Author Topic: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien  (Read 7150 times)

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sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2017, 18:24:57 »
One more.

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2017, 18:29:49 »
A few sessions of filling, sanding and undercoat and it's starting to get there.

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2017, 18:31:31 »
A couple more...

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2017, 15:35:45 »
I've finally got back to work on this one.
My parts from Shapeways took a little longer to arrive than anticipated but now I just about have everything I need to complete the JO'B and also the Hikurangi, which has been sidelined.
This was my second attempt at producing parts at Shapeways and the results have been OK.
I've had some ASD units printed in the past but this time I tried some smaller, more detailed items: lights, ventilators, capstans, winch drums and panama fairleads.
I started by drawing the items up as profiles. I am trying to learn a 3D drawing program but it is not as easy as it sounds so I found a 3D designer on the Shapeways forum who converted them to STL files for a meagre fee.
The finished product are great. As they are printed in Ultra Fine Detail material they cannot be painted with enamels it never dries. Using acrylics has been a new experience not convinced about it yet. It doesn't have the same feel as enamel, not as tough or as resilient, and a much thicker coat as well. Luckily I only have to use it on a few areas that won't get too much handling.
In hindsight the panama fairleads/chocks could have been a little smaller but I wasn't sure how fine I could go with the thicknesses or details. Not bad for a first go.

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2017, 15:38:29 »
...and we have a winner!!
The hull is now completed and we've reached the stage where I need to decide on the colour scheme.
I've posted this build on two other forums and the votes for the preferred colour schemes has been strongly supporting the 'tiger' camouflage version, closely followed by the 'pilot' version.
However I've decided to go for the Royal New Zealand Navy post war grey.
Sorry, boys here's why:
I really liked the 'tiger' scheme but I have on my wish list a model of the Saint Class tug Toia (ex St Fregus/Boniface) that served my home town for many years after WWI and that tug did come with a dazzle paint job.
I aslo liked the green pilot version but also on my wish list (it's a long list) is a tug from the South Island port of Timaru, and all of their tugs are the same pale green.
The traditional black/white/buff funnel JO'B has in civilian life looks good too but I have a few tugs in the same colours already.
So I've gone for post war pale grey.
My reasoning is that 625 was initially handed over to the RNZN as the Kawitiri and I'm thinking that it would have been finished the same as 627 which also went to the navy and was run by a civilian crew. So pale grey with buff stack and ventilators.
Hey, it was immediately after the war so they had a lot of spare grey paint lying around.
I wanted to show the JO'B's naval heritage and I also like the way the black on the lower hull curves up under the anchor/bow.
However, the main reason for this choice is that my father was in the navy around this time and I like to think that he may have seen 625 somewhere around the navy base.

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2017, 15:42:46 »
The fenders/rubbing strips on the original are some type of hardwood, probably Australian or Fijian as teak from Asia would have been unavailable during the war. These ones are basswood with several coats of a very diluted, warm grey wash.

Kev30

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #36 on: February 14, 2017, 02:04:05 »
Looking at this class of tug you have to say the old tugs then had character and its a very interesting article keep us posted on progress.

Regards
Kevin

VANYA

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2017, 01:09:08 »
Tomorrow I will hopefully meet Steve in Wellington and see first hand his brilliant work.

Wonder what else he has started?
VANYA

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #38 on: February 23, 2017, 11:49:42 »
I made sure Hayden had a couple of beers before showing him the fleet.
They always looks better after a few.
Made a bit of progress lately but can't upload any pictures same old problem 'failed security'.
It's very frustrating and I'm sure it drive people away from the site.
Any moderators out there that can fix it?

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2017, 11:01:14 »
The funnel has a ply spine and ribs/formers with a 0.2mm styrene skin. The styrene is wrapped around 3 times to give it some strength.
The wiring conduit is styrene rod, and the light shutter is also thin styrene. Still needs the base/pivot for the derrick and a small winch drum on the side.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 11:07:38 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2017, 11:04:26 »
The ventilators were printed at Shapeways. They look OK, a little bit of pixelation but I can live with it. Not too happy with the finish of the acrylic paint, as I mentioned in a previous post.
These need to be the same colour as the funnel so had to use the same acrylic on the funnel. You need to be super careful with the paint as it scratches and marks very easily.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 11:06:49 by sea monkey »

VANYA

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #41 on: March 01, 2017, 01:44:24 »
Ah the exhibition quality tug builder is back at the table :-)

Yes, thanks Steve for the visit and the Indian takeway and beers. No need for the beers my friend, it was pefection and there are some real gems amongst those brass etching and Shapeways creations you have designed.

I wish I had a skills and the patience to finish a model like you and to bring all those skills together. Some of those pieces are infinitesimally small and seemingly look almost impossible to see let alone paint and position.

Thank you so much for a evening Steve.

Hayden
VANYA

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #42 on: March 07, 2017, 14:28:30 »
Thanks Hayden, everything looks better after a few beers and in dim lighting. Ha ha.

Back to the build...
Things seem to be falling into place pretty quickly now. I made up the anchor windlass from styrene (frame), PE brass gears and wheel/handles (from my sheet of etchings) and brass rod. The warping drum I had 3D printed at Shapeways, along with a the capstan and panama fairleads. Quite happy with the result.

The life buoy racks are also PE brass, the life buoys are laser cut ply with 3 thick coats of paint.

The railings are brass rod an PE brass stanchions.

I broke my usual rule of not applying the name until the very last act on the completed model. When it is all finished there will be too much chance of snapping something off while applying the rubdown names and hull markings, so they went on now. Hope I haven't jinxed the project by breaking with tradition.

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #43 on: March 07, 2017, 14:30:46 »
A couple more photos of the finished bow area.

sea monkey

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Re: WWII USN YTL625 / James O達rien
« Reply #44 on: March 07, 2017, 14:44:22 »
I've also finished the mast, all 5 sections of railings, and the 7 ladders.
I made a simple jig to make the soldering easier and was able to get everything done without too many mishaps. The soldering part was quick, filing and cleaning up the metalwork took about a morning.
All pieces are now painted and ready to be attached.