Author Topic: Lloydsman Build  (Read 4584 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Studiojohn

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
Re: Lloydsman Build
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2017, 03:51:08 »
Here is the next level which has been printed and is now in primer. This will fit directly over the coaming seen in the previous picture



The next deck and wheelhouse structure was printed in one piece and includes the bridge wings. Also shown here in primer and will locate on top of the previous part.



Above this is the open bridge and rain guard which I printed separately. Once primed and sanded I will glue them together and locate the assembled part using locating tabs printed on the underside of the rainguard





Here are the wheelhouse and open bridge dry fitted. Note the locating support for the main mast.



More later

regards
John


2tugboats

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 609
  • Roughly 3/4 inch scale semi accurate
    • Two Tugboats
Re: Lloydsman Build
« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2017, 19:05:16 »
Thank you for sharing John. Quite educational and your fine photos have given
me lots of new ideas. Keep up the fine sharing here on the Forum.

Michael
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

marky

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 35
Re: Lloydsman Build
« Reply #17 on: May 03, 2017, 04:37:36 »
Do you sand your surface  build lines off ? as I have read, though it might not be feasible without a fume cabinet ," using Chloroform heated to 70 degrees C pass the part through the fumes and the surface marks melt away" worth a try if you know any chemists . Also does your printer also print a support structure in another material? as parts I had printed at the local library had support material that melted off when washed in in a mild caustic solution.

Cheers Marky   

marky

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 35
Re: Lloydsman Build
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2017, 03:14:25 »
Also forgot to say  I had my parts built in PLA and left them on the window ledge and they have distorted with the heat ,I have since been told that getting them done in ABS would be better as it is stronger and more stable. Any thoughts?

cheers Marky

Studiojohn

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 14
Re: Lloydsman Build
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2017, 09:27:55 »
Marky

I don't try to sand the PLA directly as its too fibrous to be effective although very fine papers or files might have some effect. The real secret is to get the part as accurate as possible and then post process.  I use xtc 3d resin (although most epoxy resins would also work I suppose) in very small quantities, then sand that surface followed by filler primer. There are lots of fine surface fillers around but I only use a polyester based filler after sealing the surface first with epoxy. I tried using acetone fumes once as has been suggested but I consider it to be too uncontrollable for satisfactory use.

My printer is a dual head and can print with PVA as a support material, but to be honest I find it doesn't particularly give a good surface finish so I try to design my components to work using PLA only.  I am able to print hollow turrets about 4 inches wide with no problems at all. The Felix 3 won't give the same results that you would get from a Projet etc but the materiel and method of addition is different for those type of printers. 

As regards leaving the parts on a window ledge I have to say that you would get the same result if you left an Airfix kit on the ledge so obviously the answer is not to do it. However once the part is primed and painted it should be much less susceptible to heat. Also, of course when you take you your boat to the lake on a hot sunny day and leave it out in the sun for a few hours lots of other parts would start to do strange things as well. I do not believe that PLA is any better or any worse than any other type of plastic normally used by home hobbyists.

ABS might be more stable and stronger but the printing temperature is hotter than PLA and also gives off toxic fumes. I have my printer in my library so its a personal choice to stick with PLA and I have to say I have had some great results so far. That's not to say I haven't had any disasters but that has not been the choice of plastic just poor drawing and post processing. I will shortly be posting up some more pictures of progress. I have just installed my smoke unit and am currently trying to figure a mechanical connection to link the smoke control to the throttle. The Unit has a control switch which works perfectly well and I just want operate it with a Y lead servo but its not that simple so now looking at a transmitter mixing solution.

For highly detailed small parts or for that matter large items with high level of detail I have them printed on a commercial Projet and then use that as a master to cast in resin.

Hope this helps

John
« Last Edit: May 07, 2017, 10:06:59 by Studiojohn »