Author Topic: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki  (Read 2028 times)

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sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #45 on: October 29, 2017, 15:53:02 »
Now that all of the heavy duty work on the hull has been finished, I can start adding a few details: starting with the fairleads and fender housing.

The fairlead are basically a piece of styrene tubing with some styrene rivets around the outside. when sanded down and primed they will look fine.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2017, 16:08:01 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #46 on: October 29, 2017, 15:59:47 »
The fender housing/brackets are strip styrene with styrene rod 'bolts'.
The fenders went on quite easily and the housing took less time than I had imagined.
Also added the grates (brass rod) in the freeing ports/scuppers and a panel running above them on the inside of the bulwarks to hide any messy glueing and the ends of the grate rods.

model tugman

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #47 on: October 29, 2017, 23:26:55 »
Nice Steve 👍👍👍👍
Tugs are for life      George B

2tugboats

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2017, 07:26:28 »
Thank you Steve for your priceless sharing. Your work is a healthy portion of inspiration. I have found countless ideas for building one's tug from your pictures. For example, if I had know of your way of laying out port holes, I could have made mine that little bit more to look like a super clean job of it.

I have experienced, with building a large tug model, that being top heavy was my most huge mistake. Looking over your superior workmanship, I'm sure you will do fine in that consern.

Your contribution to the Forum here is huge and outstanding. There is a lull in the Forum participation of late and your sharing is what makes this place glow with tugboat spirit and hope for a person's build.

A pleasure to watch your building Steve, Michael
Yet another case of why men and women go down to the sea in ships. . .A pleasure to be here and smell the salt air. Thank you Tugboat Forum. . .Michael in Anacortes, Washington www.twotugboats.com

VANYA

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #49 on: October 30, 2017, 19:13:51 »
Hi Steve.

Have you got that webcam in yet?

I visited the patent slipway just down below your house when I was up in Wellington. It's a great spot.

Looking good!

There is a bit of scale activity at our model boat club so thinking the SeaTow 25 and barge might be needed. Will get out those frames.

I guess we can scale up the drawings to cut a bigger one too.Maybe Simon and I should hop in the Cessna and fly up for a hull drawing CAD tutorial with you.

Hayden

VANYA

tugnut

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #50 on: October 30, 2017, 23:13:05 »
Hi Steve.very interesting build great job.
regards John b.
john b

sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #51 on: October 31, 2017, 10:33:30 »
Thanks George, John and Michael.

Hayden Hasn't been a ship in the slip for about 20 years but it had plenty of use in its day.
It looked pretty impressive with a big boat in there. In the 1960s the flying boat station was in the bay opposite, a ferry came to the head of the bay, and plenty of tug activity at the fuel depot on the other side of the bay so it would have been a very interesting spot. Only the fuel depot left now and the tugs are in and out in less than an hour. Although they always race each other back to town. Those Damens can get up a fair speed when needed gives any little yachts a nice bow wave to deal with.

The Koranui drawing will scale up easily. My previous laser guy has moved to the Wairarapa and I'm using a new outfit in the Hutt. Much cheaper and they also have a big router. Simon's Ohau in 9mm poplar ply should be no problem on their laser. A bit slower on the router and no 90 inner angles. I need to drop out a sample for them to experiment on.

sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #52 on: October 31, 2017, 10:40:37 »
Back at the bench things have been progressing well. I've repaired the snapped off skeg and attached the shaft support struts. This all went together better than I had imagined I love it when that happens.
The keg now has a 2mm brass rod pinning it together and is pretty solid. The struts are a sandwich of styrene/brass strip,styrene. The aren't going anywhere touchwood!
« Last Edit: October 31, 2017, 11:23:10 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #53 on: October 31, 2017, 10:52:36 »
The hull has now had about 8 sessions of fill/sand/seal and that's about as far as I'll go. I'm happy with the surface.
The stern curves look OK and I've come to terms with the reshaped bow. Not much more to add to the hull exterior other than the Kort nozzle, and that's 2 weeks away (hopefully).
« Last Edit: October 31, 2017, 15:00:50 by sea monkey »

model tugman

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #54 on: October 31, 2017, 10:58:59 »
Nice !👍👍👍
Tugs are for life      George B

sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #55 on: October 31, 2017, 11:13:31 »
Final job was to attach the rolling chocks/bilge keels. These are styrene with brass pins through the hull.
I hate these things they are asking to be snapped off. Luckily they don't sit anywhere near the cradle/stand.
The 240 grit sandpaper has now been replaced with 600 wet&dry, the hull's as smooth as a baby's bum and it's now ready for some paint. This is when things can go horribly wrong.

model tugman

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #56 on: October 31, 2017, 14:11:06 »
It is a lovely looking hull matey, twice the size and working would be awesome.
Tugs are for life      George B

VANYA

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #57 on: October 31, 2017, 14:20:06 »
Steve.

I would be keen on a scaled up SeaTow tug, something around 30-36 inches. She is big displacement but has room for big motors.

Have a go if you like and we will get the whole lot down.

Your newbuild is looking fine.

H

VANYA

sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #58 on: November 05, 2017, 13:44:28 »
Hayden enlarging the Seatow to double the size you have takes it up to 1080mm LOA, which works out to 40mm prop size. We could gang it up with the Ohau on a full sheet of 9mm Poplar.
I'll get a cost for the ply and the laser cutting.

sea monkey

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Re: 1960s Refinery Tug Parahaki
« Reply #59 on: November 05, 2017, 13:58:21 »
While I'm waiting for the Kort nozzle to arrive I made a start on the superstructure.

The laser cut parts slotted together fairly easily although the curves at the bow end put quite a strain on the ply. I probably should have cut those pieces at 90 to the grain of the ply. The Birch ply is not very flexible so it needed quite a bit of glue, internal bracing and some serious clamping to keep it all square and true.

Still at the early stages but you can get the idea.