Author Topic: What are the correct names for these?  (Read 344 times)

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sea monkey

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What are the correct names for these?
« on: October 26, 2017, 10:58:34 »
What are the correct terms for these parts of a boat?  I don't have any idea what they are.
A: The holes for the hawsers.
B: This part of the stern curve.
C: The bottom footing for the rudder.
D: This type of undercut stern.
E: The supports for the bulwarks. Are they knees?
F: The housing over the rudder/steering gear.
G: This type of sharp angled stern bulwark.

model tugman

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2017, 12:18:25 »
Hi Steve,these are some of the names that we use.
A. panama ports
C. Skeg
E knees or sometimes stanchions.
F. If fully enclosed.   Steering gear cover.  Or if the open type as on old steam tugs etc   Rope cradle.
B & D. Transom
G is just the after bulwark in our neck of the woods.  Geo.
Tugs are for life      George B

des

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2017, 19:52:39 »
Hi Steve

Here are a couple of alternatives in Aussie-speak -

a -  deadeyes, sometimes fairleads (although this is not a strictly correct term), or hawse holes.  I've also seen references where the opening is just called a "hawse".

b - the underside of the stern can sometimes be called a "riser" or a "counter" - but I wouldn't suggest that either of these terms are universally used.

c - the bottom rudder bearing, if present, would be supported on the skeg

f - if open, it would probably be called grating, or "the grating".  Generally you only see this where the stern structure is not deep enough to accommodate the steering gear below the deck;  although I've also noticed closed-in enclosures on some more modern Schottel or ASD tugs, probably to enable removal through the deck.

g - the aft bulwark would be called a transom if the stern of the boat is squared off (as in most twin-screw boats), although strictly speaking the transom is the part of the hull in this location, not the bulwark itself.

Along these line I've also seen the terms "gunwales" and "cap rails" used somewhat interchangeably.  I think most of us with a British heritage would use "gunwales", while many (but probably not all) Americans would use "cap rails".
Des.

Volker

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2017, 00:35:37 »
The Panama port or fairlead is only the fairlead at the bow on the ship's centerline. All others are just fairleads or hawse. The locomotives on both sides of the Panama Canal locks use this. So both forces work in the ship's centerline.
Regards, Volker

model tugman

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2017, 02:40:42 »
This is good , we are getting some posted again.👍👍👍👍👍👍
Tugs are for life      George B

sea monkey

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2017, 11:48:30 »
Thanks boys, good effort.
Would the angle of the after bulwark, as in G, be called 'tumblehome'? Or is that used only for the hull itself?
Steve

des

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2017, 13:24:19 »
No, the tumblehome refers to the shape of the hull, usually of a sailing boat.  Looking at the boat or ship from the stern, the tumblehome is the inward curve past the vertical of the hull sides and back towards  the hull centreline.  in the olde days of sailing ships this reduced the tendency to crush the hull sides by the tension in the mast stays pulling the sides inward - this tension was countered by the deck beams "pushing" back outwards.

Des.

sea monkey

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2017, 16:17:47 »
OK, next question:

What are these thing called? They stop any broken towing lines from flicking around the deck.

des

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Re: What are the correct names for these?
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2017, 19:48:40 »
Sorry, I don't recall what these are called.  But they are also used for drying ropes and lines.  When hooking up for a tow, a messenger line is often fired onto the ship to be towed, using a rocket;  the towline would then be attached to the messenger, and pulled back to the tug.  When recovering everything after the job is done, the messenger is usually wet, and  is therefore coiled and hung onto these "horns" to dry.

Des.