Author Topic: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea  (Read 8842 times)

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sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2018, 12:31:39 »
Slowly refining and smoothing the hull. Only at the 240 and 400 grit stage at the moment, will work my way up to 800 and finally 1200 for the 'smooth as a baby's bum' finish. Or as our German viewers say: Glatt wie ein Babypopo!

In the meantime, between sanding sessions, I started on the bulwarks. I had pre-planned for this by laser cutting a heap of bulwark knees, and the appropriate sized base slots out of the deck. The knees slot into place very easily although on this particular model they are very narrow and will need delicate handling until the bulwarks are applied. The knees are CA glued in using a few Lego blocks to keep everything square and flush with the shear of the deck

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2018, 12:33:39 »
I started the bulwarks at the bow and stern, which have the sharpest and most complex curves. These areas are skinned in 2 layers of 0.5mm ply. Each piece is cut out of the sheet at 90 to the other so that the grain/layers are opposite when glued. It's much stronger than it sounds and can take quite a bit of rough handling. The mid sections are relatively straight so they are just a strip of 1mm ply, laid with the 2 outer ply layers going with the grain, along the deck.

Did that all make sense?

When cutting the ply I only worry about getting a good fit with the deck (more or less) . I always leave excess above the knees and just sand it down when everything is solidly in place.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2018, 12:36:16 »
Still plenty of work to do yet but now that the bulwarks are on I can start getting the hull to a final 'Babypopo' finish.

VANYA

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2018, 14:59:46 »
Its quite a fine hull really, long and narrow compared to the usual steam tug we expect. Maybe something to do with it working on the river.

Have you got the model length and beam for the viewers?

HB
VANYA

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2018, 12:42:23 »
Hey Hayden, I see by your post that your checking out the forum during work time better give yourself a written warning.

The original Kumea was 73.3ft LOA, 16ft beam and 7ft draft. Unfortunately I found that out after I had started. From the only photo I had estimated 80ft, which works out at 1/50 to 488mm x 104mm. So my one is proportionally 6% larger I can live with that.

I had initially thought that it was built in 1905, can't even remember where that came from however it looks like she was built in 1928 by Scott & Sons, Glascow. Quite a dated looking design for the late 20s   and only 33hp. First port was Auckland and finally ended up in Greymouth where she replaced the last paddle wheel tug in NZ (the Westland).

Kumea means 'haul away'.

Kiwinz

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #20 on: April 06, 2018, 23:46:25 »
Haydens boss has already noted his work time internet activity and issued the appropriate warnings on more than one occasion! Not that I'm looking too.. I'm trying to fiqure out the connections between scale tug modelling and small arms ammunition production but yet to come to some concrete conclusions.

I have to say the KUMEA is quickly moving towards another masterpiece. Shes looking great.

Would you do a contract job to complete my RT MAGIC?

Simon

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2018, 13:59:48 »
The younger generation just has no work ethic these days, Simon. :) I see by you're post that you are still at the desk well after hours.

No way, you're doing a way better job on the RT Magic than I could  you're woodworking is a masterclass.
Besides you have a bit more time before the 10 years is up. These projects always look daunting at the start but I just look at it as being half an hour's quiet time every day. It's how you eat an elephant one bite at a time.
I bet you finish the Magic before Hayden finishes his Aorangi (that should get him stirred into action) :)
« Last Edit: April 11, 2018, 12:41:45 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2018, 12:45:06 »
I've managed to get in a few solid sessions on the hull over the past week.

Added the rubbing strakes/bands/strips (made from basswood), and the capping rail (made from 0.5mm ply). The first attempt at the rubbing strip didn't look right as I had ended it too short of the bow. It goes right around. This has subsequently been fixed without any drama.

In these photos the upward curve of the capping rail at the bow is a bit too steep and abrupt. This has been extended and flattened out.

I have one photo of the real boat and I really need to look at it more often doh!


sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2018, 12:46:19 »
I'm almost happy with the surface and shape of the hull however some of the balsa I used for the planking was very soft and even when covered with a good coating of resin the hull has suffered a few pressure dents. Easily fixed but a pain in the proverbial. Handling it with kid gloves now and I've covered the building stand with felt as a precaution. Hopefully only a few more session to go. Still need to fix that rudder post.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2018, 14:55:58 »
After few more shaping sessions the hull was about where I wanted to be. Having a few really good layers of primer followed by a fine sand with 400, 600 and finally 1200 grit gets it to the 'smooth as a baby's bum' finish.

For this project I thought that I might have a go at plating well, more simulated, and just for effect. At 1/50 scale 1/2inch plate is only 0.25mm thick that's only the thickness of a couple of layers of paint. So I masked up the hull to form plates at 4ft tall. I brushed on several coats of primer and when the tape was removed just lightly buffed the hard edges with some 600 grit paper. This took several days waiting for the layers to dry completely.

The plate lines were marked out in the same way you would do the waterline a pencil taped to a jig, run around the levelled hull.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2018, 14:57:54 »
The final result turned out OK. I won't worry about rivets (that's a whole other story to be covered later) or plate join lines. At this size I'm OK with it as it is.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2018, 14:59:41 »
Also managed to repair the rudder post, make the rudder, and add the hawser holes. The hawser hole surrounds are some PE brass that I had etched at PPL in Scotland at the start of the build.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 18:10:57 by sea monkey »

model tugman

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2018, 22:44:46 »
Well you seem to be getting the hang of this building lark Steve, another lovely hull.
Tugs are for life      George B

VANYA

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2018, 11:46:49 »
This guy seems good, very good infact.
VANYA

Kev30

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #29 on: April 16, 2018, 13:19:49 »
I agree with George that looks like a nicely built hull there Steve and it's also good to see a scratch built hull  made to the proper shape / profile rather than a GRP hull of something similar but not exactly what you want.
I'll be keep an eye on progress with you build, unfortunately no building this end as I'm decorating  ??? ??? ???

Regards
Kevin