Author Topic: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea  (Read 3121 times)

tugboyben and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #45 on: May 08, 2018, 13:22:19 »
Well, the rivet decals are an unqualified failure. I followed the instructions but must have done something fundamentally wrong. They flake off as soon as the wind changes. I've had to replace or repair many sections and they are still peeling off.

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #46 on: May 08, 2018, 13:26:49 »
A few more photos. These rivet decals have got me a bit gun-shy now. I'm treating everything with kid gloves. The sooner I get some top coat on them the better.

tassie48

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #47 on: May 09, 2018, 12:37:06 »
Great looking build mate your attention to detail is top class and a old home port boat as well tassie48

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #48 on: May 12, 2018, 15:49:18 »
Thanks Gregg.
Managed to get a couple of top coats onto the superstructure over the past few days.

I've gone for a grey and very dark red hull, dark orange deck and dark brown superstructure. The wheelhouse is teak with an cream roof. The funnel is dark red with a cream stripe and black top. The original names for these colours were: ivory (roof), chocolate (superstructure), whale grey (hull), oxblood (below waterline) and burgundy (funnel). And with the teak, it's a very 'roaring twenties' sounding colour scheme. Sounds horrible but it looks OK.

Here are the first pieces to be painted. My attempt at a decal riveted non slip walkway peeled of during painting. I had to sand that area back, re-seal and re-spray. Several other small bits of the decal strips also flaked off. CBA fixing a few areas.

The decals are great in theory, I'll just have to figure out the correct way to apply them. Or stay away from riveted hulls.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 16:05:04 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #49 on: May 12, 2018, 15:51:21 »
Also added the hatch handles and the funnel stay anchor points to the main cabin block.

The engine and boiler room hatch portholes are PE brass frames and brass rod bars and handles.

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #50 on: May 12, 2018, 15:56:34 »
A few more:

The main hatch handles are PE brass. Lining them up was easier than I had imagined. Not sure what colour to paint them, if any. May leave them as weathered brass.

So far, so good... although the chocolate brown colour is a real dust magnet.

tassie48

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #51 on: May 12, 2018, 17:08:32 »
WOW great work mate do like the attention to detail lifting eyes on the hatches and skylight protectors even the slider companionway hatch cover just need some crew to finish off tassie48

model tugman

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 2807
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #52 on: May 12, 2018, 23:24:12 »
Brilliant Steve👍👍👍👍👍👍👍👍👍👍
Tugs are for life      George B

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #53 on: May 14, 2018, 12:04:30 »
I've been studying your techniques, mate.

I also have a question: This tug had no anchor well, the anchor was stowed on the deck and a davit dropped it over the side. It had a windlass to wind it back up and then the davit would lift it over the gunwale onto the deck.

What sort of system would the chain run through from the gypsy wheel to the hawse hole? It's a straight line but at an angle.

tugnut

  • Admiral Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 2059
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #54 on: May 14, 2018, 21:43:13 »
Hi Steve, great build i have come back over here for you.
On the TID tugs the windlass was over to the port side so the chain ran straight.
Hope that helps regards John.

john b

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #55 on: May 16, 2018, 12:45:24 »
Thanks John, it helps but I probably can't put the windlass off centre. Might have to rig up some sort of channeling. We'll see...

Meanwhile... next step was the wheelhouse/bridge.

The laser cut ply parts went together very quickly. Just needed to sand the corners for a bevel fit. I had etched plank lines in the ply and when stained and varnished it gives a reasonable impression of polished wood. Might be a bit extravagant for this old workhorse but it fits with the age of the tug and looks good. The doors are PE brass, the life buoy is laser cut ply with plenty of coats of paint, and the life buoy holder is 0.5mm brass rod

The wheel is a silhouette only for effect. Other than the wheel and a very basic telegraph there will be no interior details just a coat of dark grey paint.




sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #56 on: May 16, 2018, 12:46:12 »
I've picked up plenty of good ideas through following other peoples' threads here, and the awning brackets and tarpaper roof are straight from Longbike's bag of tricks on RCGroups. I'm sure a few of you will recognise a few of your own techniques in here from now on. Thanks.

VANYA

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 440
  • Ships need tugs.
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #57 on: May 17, 2018, 23:26:14 »
That engineroom and boiler room hatch  and housing is brilliant. Absolutly brilliant. 

That detail would look great on the Steam paddle tug Titan Steve. wink..wink!

HB
VANYA

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #58 on: Yesterday at 19:45:28 »
Funny you should mention that!  My 'to do' list is starting to get of hand. Tika next, then I'll have to start planning for next year. Could be Tumeke (tiny pusher tug), Titan (big paddle tug = daunting), Te Maru, Te Matua (both large) or Maui (small, classic 60s Voith drive). Too many to choose from.

I've ordered some parts from Shapeways so I can't get started on a couple of things yet, but I was able to knock out the railings, rails and ladders.
This tug doesn't have many of these so the whole lot only took a few hour's soldering. The ladders are all brass rod so a simple jig was needed to hold everything in place while soldering. Worked out fine. Strangely enough, I enjoy soldering, it's very satisfying.

The soldering didn't need to much of a clean up, and after a quick undercoat I was able to give it a top coat of the deck colour.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 20:00:00 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

  • Site Supporter
  • Admiral Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #59 on: Yesterday at 19:54:36 »
The funnel was the next job.

Started out with the basic cylinder. I couldn't get brass or styrene tubing at the right diameter so I padded out some 15mm brass with layers of styrene to take it up to the required diameter. Simple enough nut when I'm using styrene that thin 0.2mm I'm paranoid about getting ripples as it is glued down. Not too bad this time and I just needed to fill and sand the seams.

Before I started the build I had photo etched some brass fitting for the funnel: some seam/join rings and a stack top/flange and grating. One of the rings has eyes for the stays. The whistle is a piece of brass rod. These bits aren't attached yet, only pushed together for this photo.

The flange for the base of the stack is already attached to the boat deck.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 19:58:12 by sea monkey »