Author Topic: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea  (Read 34199 times)

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tugnut

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #60 on: May 21, 2018, 20:41:07 »
Very nice love all the brass work.
john b

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #61 on: May 23, 2018, 12:49:10 »
Thanks John, I'm enjoying your latest project.

Well the funnel turned out OK.

Got some paint onto it and it looks alright.

The red of the funnel needs to match the ventilators. These are 3D printed and can't handle enamel paint so I need to do these parts in acrylic.
I have a love/hate relationship with acrylics. Some brands and some colours are OK but there seems to be a great variance between them.
The red that I ended up using is very transparent and took a lot of coats to get a smooth even finish. It ended up darker than I had planned because of all the transparent layers.
I can live with it. At least they dry quickly.

The ivory band is crying out for an emblem or logo of some sort the K is just to see how something would look, it won't be staying.

The water tank (I think it's a water tank) goes immediately behind the wheelhouse. I assume it is for the galley and head. Or it's an oil tank for the generator?

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #62 on: May 25, 2018, 13:35:28 »
Once the funnel was completed I could start assembling the final superstructure. I don't usually do this until I have made every component. This time I couldn't resist seeing how it all worked together.

First step was to attach a very basic telegraph to the wheelhouse/bridge deck.

A friend's father worked at for Wanganui Harbour Board in the 1950s. He remembers going onboard a tug with his dad as a young boy, and particularly remembers that the cast iron step treads had a fish scale pattern on them. I've tried to re-create that pattern on the steps/companionway.


sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #63 on: May 25, 2018, 13:36:31 »
He also has some timber that this father 'salvaged' from a tug undergoing repairs around this time that will be the stand for this Kumea. Yes - he is also a 'magpie' and can't throw anything out like me. So I now have a 100 year old piece of timber, with history, for the final touches. My friend also has the red glass from a port nav light from a tug from that era. It is the most intense red I've ever seen in glass, it is a very beautiful piece of glass.

The other bits and pieces all fitted together with out any drama. Threading the funnel stays was a delicate wee process, I'll have to be very careful not to snag them.


sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #64 on: May 25, 2018, 13:37:11 »
So far so good. Now I have to wait for Shapeways to deliver some capstans and winch drums before I can go any further.

I'll have to find something to do while I'm waiting. Mmmm...

VANYA

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #65 on: July 17, 2018, 19:59:04 »
Hi Steve.

Any activity of late?

Hayden

VANYA

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #66 on: July 18, 2018, 21:44:04 »
Hi Hayden

Not much progress I'm afraid. Recently started a new job and haven't had a lot of spare time lately. Find it too hard to work in the evening in the winter eyesight isn't as good as it was. Besides I'm too knackered after a day at work to put any time in at the workbench. Hope to get a bit done this weekend.

I see that the Timaru Maritime Museum sold off a lot of their collection did you pick anything up?

VANYA

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #67 on: July 20, 2018, 18:57:55 »
Hi Steve.

Ok so back to the daily grind.

Its only a hobby so remember that.

I did not see anything about a Maritime Museum. Was that the old Danish Coaster M/v Jenka?  it is being cut up so there were a few trinkets but nothing worthwhile for me. We do not have a Maritime museum to my knowledge in our town.

The Aoraki tug is up for sale too. Chinese built but not a great vessel in the ocean. A river tug really.

Hayden
VANYA

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #68 on: July 21, 2018, 21:15:31 »
I saw something on Stuff about it a month ago. After the fact, luckily, as I would probably have bought a load of stuff I don't need. Might have been the South Canterbury Museum getting rid of their maritime collection. Seem to remember an intact captain's cabin was one of the items.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #69 on: July 21, 2018, 21:21:47 »
Not a lot has been posted on the forum recently. Still people reading but not many contributing. Don't feel shy, any comments welcome. We don't want to become a ghost forum.

Finally managed to get back to work on this project.

I started a new job 2 months ago and haven't had any spare time to finish the Kumea. I had forgotten how much time work takes up. Too knackered after work during the week and not enough spare time on the weekends. One of you guys should have warned me!

It's also the middle of winter and I don't enjoy working on the model after dark. Eyesight isn't what it once was.

Anyway, I have made a start on the deck equipment: capstan, samson posts and bollards, life boat and davits, mast, and anchor windlass.

This boat didn't have an anchor well and relied on a davit to lift the raised anchor over the bulwarks for storage on the deck.

There are no photos or reference of the deck or any of the equipment. So my version of the anchor windlass is based on the type used on the TID tugs only a little bigger. The capstan and davits are simple enough and based on Admiralty drawings from around that period.

It's warm enough and not too windy today so I hoped to be able to get some paint on the finished items. Started badly by dropping a full 2 litre tin of white paint onto the basement floor from height. It went everywhere: floor, bench, open tool drawer, cabinet doors and me. Wasn't able to salvage any paint (or my jeans and shoes). Used 4 litres of turps and every rag and old towel in the house trying to clean it up as much as possible and wasted about 2 hours. Not a great success but the neighbours did learn a few new words.

This is what I have so far: a mix of brass, styrene and aluminium. The mast is a piece of teak dowel sanded to a slight taper. The capstan drum was printed at Shapeways really should learn to use that lathe in the basement that I just cleaned!

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #70 on: July 21, 2018, 21:23:16 »
In hindsight the fittings on the davits would ideally have been easier to make from etched brass, same as the hose reel components.
But then, hindsight is always 20/20.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #71 on: August 30, 2018, 22:45:57 »
I see from my last post that I've been idle for 5 weeks. I've been pretty lax with time spent at the bench lately but have slowly got back into the build as time allows and I'm now pretty close to finishing if all things go according to plan.

The other day I realised I only had a couple of parts left to make: the towing bow, tow hook, tow hook rail/slide, and the name plates. I can just about see the finish line. I was able to knock these out without too much drama.

The tow hook was made from some left-over brass spare parts from the YTL tug tow hook I made last year. Only needed a little adaption to fit onto the Kumea's tow table.

The rail/slide is brass H rod and styrene endstops.

The name plates are styrene.

The one and only photo of the Kumea (first post) shows the towing bows as not being pipe or angle iron or i beam just a big section of curved steel. Easy enough.

The tow bow/arches are made up of 3 layers of thin styrene strip laminated together around a profile. I cut and sanded a piece of basswood to form the inside curve of the tow bow shape. I then held a length of styrene strip tightly around the shape and then glued another layer of styrene on top of it. It was then held in position with some balsa blocks and pins to dry. Once this had dried completely I repeated the process.

The outer layers hold the previous layer in shape. Only needed a light sand to remove a little excess glue. It is surprisingly strong and holds its shape well. Works just as well with plywood.

The first photos show the laminating process for forming the complex curves of the towing arch pretty simple stuff, and the last photos show the finished product waiting for some undercoat.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2018, 23:06:58 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #72 on: September 06, 2018, 11:07:28 »
This tug has a pudding fender on the bow and a fender on the stern. Both are the coir/rope type.

I had put off making these until the last part of the build, partly because I had no idea how I was going to make them.
I thought about:
1. Rolling them out of modelling clay (the type you bake in the oven) and stamping some surface detail on them. Couldn't get the death uniform enough.
2. 3D printing them too easy and they would look too solid.
3. Wrapping a base in some sort of material to give the impression of woven rope. Didn't look realistic

So, in the end I bit the bullet and did it the old fashioned way hitching around a rope middle but in this case; several pipe cleaners tied together..

I hadn't anticipated how many hitches would be needed or I would have settled for any of the methods above. Using a 1/50 2inch rope (cotton thread) works out to thousands of tiny half hitches about 1000 for every 10mm of fender. And each 10mm takes about 2 hours. I've finished the stern fender (about 14 hours) and still have the pudding to go.

I've always liked the New York style beard fenders so I'm thing of adding one to the front of the Kumea but at the moment I am pretty much over hitching. I needed a fairly long section of rope fender to complete the Hikurangi which has been languishing in a cupboard almost finished for over 12 months. I'm 15mm into 130mm so it's going to be along slog.

Here is the stern fender before dyeing/staining.

I think my next project will have to be a bit more modern and have rubber fenders or tyres!

Bugger!! Getting the "attachment failed security" message again. Hopefully the moderators will get it sorted soon as I'm sure this has been deterring members from posting in the past.

des

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #73 on: September 06, 2018, 14:10:52 »
Hi Steve

Try Float-a-Boat in Melbourne - they can supply woven rope fenders for reasonable prices, and saves you all that half-hitching, and all those hours.

Des.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #74 on: September 08, 2018, 23:47:37 »
Hi Des. Yes, I have a couple of those fenders from Float-a-boat but they are too big for 1/50.
The Kumea stern fender is 80mm long and only 10mm Diameter at the fattest point.
Still unable to post a photo