Author Topic: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea  (Read 10657 times)

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sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #75 on: September 10, 2018, 23:50:58 »
Success!
Finally got the image to load up.

This is the stern fender finished and ready for staining. I'm working on a similar but longer and fatter version to finally finish the Hikurangi.
I also need a smaller pudding fender for the bow and a couple of rope fenders to hang over the bulwarks. That's probably another week of evenings spent hitching. Happy days!
« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 23:57:50 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #76 on: September 28, 2018, 12:39:06 »
Whew! All fenders finished and dyed.
I got a bit cocky with my knotting skills towards the end and decided to add a few side fenders. I'm glad that's all over – it wasn't doing my eyes any good at all.
I need to put some eyes or fairleads onto the capping rail or the bulwarks to tie the fenders to.
Now I can start assembling and attaching the last few bits and pieces. The last piece that needed to be made was a rope cradle for the rear deck.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #77 on: October 05, 2018, 11:36:35 »
I've pretty much emptied my box of bits and assembled everything, and attached them.
I might have mentioned earlier that this tug didn't have any anchor wells – the anchor was stowed on the deck and lifted over the bulwarks by a davit.
This all turned out OK so the mast stays could be installed, the forward engine room ventilators, and the samson posts and bollards put in place.
The davit is mostly brass, the pulleys are made up from the PE brass parts on my sheet of parts.
The windlass is loosely based on the windlass used on the TID tugs. It's all styrene – same as the fairleads at the bow.
The bollards etc are styrene
The nav lights (always my least enjoyed part of any build) weren't such a hassle this time.
So far so good
« Last Edit: October 05, 2018, 11:40:41 by sea monkey »

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #78 on: October 09, 2018, 22:39:12 »
The boat davits were also finished and installed. Making up the pulleys and rigging them took a little time – and required the ventilators to be re-positioned and repainted.

The tow hook and tow table gear is fairly basic and went together smoothly. The hose reel has subsequently been moved from the deck to the boat deck. Still need to make up a hydrant for it.

All coming together nicely now. Just about all finished, only the fenders to attach, and a display stand to make.

Am I talking to myself?
« Last Edit: October 09, 2018, 22:45:01 by sea monkey »

des

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #79 on: October 10, 2018, 03:32:47 »
No - you're not talking to yourself;  I'm reading your posts, and trying to learn from them, so please keep it up.

I'm a bit surprised that you are making your display stand last - do you make a separate cradle to hold the model during construction?

This is another point of difference I've noticed between your work and mine - you seem to build non-working models for display, whereas I build working RC models - and once they are built I lose interest in them, 'cos the pleasure is in the building, rather than anything else.  Also, you build 'em much quicker than I do;  you build several in a year (often it seems, with several on the go at once), whereas  it takes me a couple of years for each model, one at a time.

Des.

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #80 on: October 10, 2018, 20:29:20 »
Thanks Des, for a minute I thought I was 'last one out, turn off the lights'.

And yes, I have a seperate construction stand. More robust than a display version. Actually I have about 4 of various sizes and one always seems to just fit the project at the time.

I also lose interest in the models once they are built. Usually I'm starting to think of the next project half way through a build. Short attention span probably?
I enjoy making them more than sailing them so now they are display only.

Not having electronics or running gear helps with keeping costs down and makes construction a bit simpler. I tried early semi-retirement last year so was able to knock out a few in quick time. Back at work now so this one is taking longer than usual. I usually only have one on the go at a time but the poor little Hikurangi gets put in the too hard basket on a regular basis and has been hanging around for ages. It's back in there now as I need some replacement rubdowns for the name on the transom and that won't be happening anytime soon.

Looking forward to finishing the Kumea so that I can get started on the next project – the Tika, a 1971 harbour tug.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2018, 20:35:46 by sea monkey »

Capt.Towline

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #81 on: October 11, 2018, 00:25:39 »
Nice work Steve. I really like your Hull work and attention to detail. In fact I admire your techniques to balance build time overall: laser cut sections slottting together for speedy assembly but then taking the time on the detailing, which is fantastic btw. I think I’ll follow this example on future projects. Are you lucky enough to have your own laser cutter?

Interesting comment that models get left on the shelf as soon as they’re finished. Having never finished I can’t really comment but I’m really looking forward to playing on the pond. How long that lasts will be due to how she handles; if it’s unrealistic she’ll only see occasional outings and I’ll move on to one of the many projects I’ve wanted to start!

What’s your next project?

sea monkey

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #82 on: October 11, 2018, 22:37:17 »
Thanks Capt T. No I don't have a laser, luckily or the house would be filled with half built projects. There are a few laser cutting firms in my town _ some are purely a laser cutting service some are sign makers that offer cutting as an extra service. Some are very reasonably priced. I'm sure that it's the same in your neck of the woods. I wouldn't build without laser cut parts now.

I had planned to build the 1971 Auckland tug TIKA and have everything I need to get started however I might try and knock out in a tiny little tug before I start on the TIKA. I might try building the TUMEKE – it's a 9m pusher tug and is very unusual looking. A bit fugly really but quite unique in NZ.

Capt.Towline

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Re: Wanganui River Steam Tug: Kumea
« Reply #83 on: October 11, 2018, 23:05:41 »
Aye, that TUMEKE is fugly indeed....you’ll be the only person in the world with that model😀
The TIKA’s a tidy looking tug, both of them both with narrow beam for their length though...a vast difference to modern towage!