Author Topic: Does anyone know the name of this girl?  (Read 424 times)

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Toby

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Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« on: July 28, 2018, 15:59:29 »
 Hello all

Does anyone recognise this girl. I have spent some time searching images online but so far I have not come across anything remotely similar to enable me to find out her name or to ascertain if there are drawings of her.

Thanks in anticipation

Toby

ray28507

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2018, 13:21:12 »
hi toby  it looks like a canadian tug called keenoma  38inch long  a plan from traplet publications

http://www.traplet.com.au/keenoma-tug
B.C tugs >>  ken mackenzie~07   nellie irene~07    freewinds ~04       sidewinder'in b.c~11'   iron horse~12  malley b~16  western mariner ~14  shuswap ~17
  u.s.a tugs> >  nanuq~11  in the build  hunter  - david j

Toby

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2018, 16:33:55 »
Hello Ray

Thank you so very much for your reply.  Yes, it certainly seems to be the vessel you cite. I note that the plan info it states that drawn is one tunnel not the two illustrated. I assume they meant funnel and interesting that my photo shows two with the superstructure centred between whilst on the plan it is likely that there is one funnel with the aft section of superstructure to the side.

Thank you again and well spotted. I will order a plan. I see these are available from sarikhobbies also.

Toby

des

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2018, 18:13:09 »
I checked the link that Ray posted, to Traplet.com.au.  I found that many of the click-through links went to Sarick in the UK;  then I noticed that there is more than just a casual similarity between the two sites, and the product ranges offered.  Also, many of the links on the Traplet site are dead.  So I don't know if Traplet are still operating in Australia, or if they are simply a local branch office for Sarik in the UK.

Des.

Toby

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2018, 18:28:34 »
Hello Des

The main link; I did receive an error message before getting to the page. I note online that others sell the plans printed to order.

Toby

Toby

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2018, 17:18:02 »
I have been in contact with Norm in Canada and also corresponded with Rollie Webb, the Vice- President of Robert Allan Ltd.

Mr Webb has suggested that the only tug of similarity to the enquiry is one built in 1974 named, Keewitan. It certainly looks as thought it ought to be excepting the beam to length ratio. Yes the model plan is a freelance 'based upon' but the side view and superstructure and funnels are a match.

Norm in Canada says it looks to be an ice- breaker with the type of bow it has. 

The original has three screws. The vessel remains in service.
Plans are available, according to Mr Webb, on payment of a fee to support the maritime Museum.

Toby
« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 17:20:23 by Toby »

Toby

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2018, 17:24:48 »
I think there is certainly variation between the pdf of the real vessel and the online preview image for the model plan.

It certainly looks more solid and powerful with the broader stern and general beam.

Toby

des

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2018, 22:54:30 »
Nice looking boat.

I've found that there are often discrepancies between a vessel's published plans and data sheet, vs the real thing.  Often this is brought about by through-life changes.

Des.

Toby

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2018, 03:13:07 »
Hello Des

I think that in this instance the model is a 'made up' boat  with resemblances above deck to the real vessel. The real vessel had a draught of 2 meters and clearly the hull shape is rather different. The vessel remains and I have found a few interesting photos. Nothing of below the water line yet. 

I have just received a moment ago an email from Mr Allan and he suggests that the similarity is but only the deck house. So we all seem to agree.

It has been interesting and educational.

Which is your preference Des; model shape or the full-size vessel shape?

Toby

des

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Re: Does anyone know the name of this girl?
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2018, 15:05:42 »
Well, I like to have as much info as I can get first, including underwater details if I can find it without too much hassle - not always possible if I'm looking at a boat built in the 1970's.  But as you've noticed, even builders plans don't always match the real boat, even at delivery.

After that, I'll look for a commercial hull that is close - I can always cut away bulwarks and transom, or lengthen a hull (shortening is not always possible);  but I can't do anything about width or bow shape.  If I can't get a hull close enough, then I'll work up a set of drawings so I can build my own hull - which will almost certainly include some sacrifices in order to make the hull easier to build.  But I would certainly include such obvious features as bow thruster, bilge keels, or hull openings for "box coolers".  See the example I've posted - this represents a Burness-Corlett designed "hydroconic" tug of the 1970's, but even now, getting hull details is difficult, so I've had to basically start with a clean sheet and not much more than a "mental image" that is 45 years old.  And building a model using a commercial rounded bilge hull is out of the question since the hard chines were such a feature of the B-C hydroconic hulls.  (Thanks to Steve, Sea Monkey, for reviewing my initial hull lines drawing for this hull.)

Topsides are relatively easy, but sometimes deck machinery can be a challenge.

Des.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 15:48:55 by des »